Ukiyo-e: The Art of the Japanese Print

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Tuttle Publishing, Apr 10, 2011 - Art - 192 pages
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Ukiyo-e ("pictures of the floating world") is an art form that originated in the metropolitan culture of Edo (Tokyo) in the early seventeenth century and involved collaboration between artist, carver, printer and publisher. Printed on fragile paper using a technique of woodcut or woodblock printing, the early black and white designs soon gave way to delicate two-color prints and then to multicolored prints. Favorite subjects were portraits of beautiful geisha and courtesans, popular kabuki actors and sumo wrestlers, erotica, scenes from nature, historical subjects and even foreigners in Japan.

The charming, carefully selected ukiyo-e in this book reflect not only Japan's rich history and way of life but also reveal the author's love affair with an art form that has captured the imagination of people all over the world.

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About the author (2011)

Frederick Harris is an artist who lived in Japan for over fifty years. He was introduced to the Japanese woodblock print by the well-known printmaker Martin Lewis, and after serving in the armed forces in Korea, he moved to Japan to establish an art studio.

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