Travels during the years 1787, 1788, & 1789: undertaken more particularly with a view of ascertaining the cultivation, wealth, resources, and national prosperity of the kingdom of France. The second edition. ... By Arthur Young, ... (Google eBook)

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W. Richardson, Royal-Exchange, 1794 - Agriculture
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Page 52 - In his description of the country at the foot of the Western Pyrenees, he speaks no longer from surmise, but from knowledge. " Take* the road to Moneng, and come presently to a scene which was so new to me in France, that I could hardly believe my own eyes. A succession of many well-built, tight, and comfortable farming cottages built of stone and covered with tiles ; each having its little garden...
Page 129 - The king has been frightened by the mobs into overturning his own act of the seance royale, by writing to the presidents of the orders of the nobility and clergy, requiring them to join the commons, full in the teeth of what he had ordained before. It was represented to him, that the want of bread was so great in every part of the kingdom, that there was no extremity to which the people might not be driven : that they were nearly starving. and consequently ready to listen to any suggestions...
Page 593 - ... common nature of events, be, in the end, remarkably happy; and had the new government adopted any principles of taxation, except...
Page 396 - Where," he asks, with perfect truth, " is the little farmer to be found who will cover his whole farm with marl at the rate of 100 or 150 tons per acre...
Page 140 - ... greater part of the countrywomen in France ; it speaks, at the first sight, hard and severe labour : I am inclined to think, that they work harder than the men, and this, united with the more miserable labour of bringing a new race of slaves into the world, destroys absolutely all symmetry of person and every feminine appearance. To what are we to attribute this difference in the manners of the lower people in the two kingdoms? To GOVERNMENT.
Page 588 - ... conduct itself, that the people may not find an interest in public confusions. They will always suffer much and long, before they are effectually roused ; nothing, therefore, can kindle the flame, but...
Page 118 - The spectacle of the representatives of twenty-five millions of people, just emerging from the evils of 200 years of arbitrary power, and rising to the blessings of a freer constitution, assembled with open doors under the eye of the public, was framed to call into animated feelings every latent spark, every emotion of a liberal bosom.
Page 75 - ... he takes it with him into a room, and turns a machine enclosed in a cylindrical case, at the top of which is an electrometer, a small fine pith ball; a wire connects with a similar cylinder and electrometer in a distant apartment; and his wife, by remarking the corresponding motions of the ball, writes down the words they indicate; from which it appears that he has formed an alphabet of motions. As the length of the wire makes no difference in the effect, a correspondence might be carried on...
Page 151 - Gentlemen, we have a great number of taxes in England, which you know nothing of in France; but the tiers etat, the poor do not pay them; they are laid on the rich; every window in a man's house pays; but if he has no more than six windows, he pays nothing; a Seigneur, with a great estate, pays the...
Page 9 - King was seated between his two brothers, and seemed by his carriage and inattention to wish himself a hunting. He would certainly have been as well employed, as in hearing afterwards from his throne a feudal oath of chivalry, I suppose, or some such nonsense, administered to a boy of ten years old.

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