The Court and Court Society in Ancient Monarchies (Google eBook)

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A. J. S. Spawforth
Cambridge University Press, Oct 4, 2007 - History
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Monarchy was widespread as a political system in the ancient world. This 2007 volume offers a substantial discussion of ancient monarchies from the viewpoint of the ruler's court. The monarchies treated are Achaemenid and Sassanian Persia, the empire of Alexander, Rome under both the early and later Caesars, the Han rulers of China and Egypt's Eighteenth Dynasty. A comparative approach is adopted to major aspects of ancient courts, including their organisation and physical setting, their role as a vehicle for display, and their place in monarchial structures of power and control. This approach is broadly inspired by work on courts in later periods of history, especially early-modern France. The case studies confirm that ancient monarchies created the conditions for the emergence of a court and court society. The culturally specific conditions in which these monarchies functioned meant variety in the character of the ruler's court from one society to another.
  

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Contents

1 New out of old? Court and court ceremonies in Achaemenid Persia
17
2 King court and royal representation in the Sasanian empire
58
3 The court of Alexander the Great between Europe and Asia
82
the creation of the court of the Roman emperor
121
5 The imperial court of the late Roman empire c AD300c AD 450
157
6 The imperial court in Han China
233
the Amarna period and later Eighteenth Dynasty
267
Bibliography
329
Index
354
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Page 22 - ... around his own palace ; the people were to dwell without the wall. And when all was built, it was Deioces first who established the rule that no one should come into the presence of the king, but all should be dealt with by the means of messengers ; that the king should be seen by no man ; and moreover that it should be in particular a disgrace for any to laugh or to spit in his presence.
Page xii - ANET Ancient Near Eastern Texts relating to the Old Testament, ed. JB Pritchard AnOr Analecta Orientalia AOAT Alter Orient und Altes Testament AOB Altorientalische Bilder zum Alten Testament, ed.
Page 22 - ... the means of messengers ; that the king should be seen by no man ; and moreover that it should be in particular a disgrace for any to laugh or to spit in his presence. He was careful to hedge himself with all this state in order that the men of his own age (who had been bred up with him and were as nobly born as he and his equals in manly excellence), instead of seeing him and being thereby vexed and haply moved to plot against him, might by reason of not seeing him deem him to be changed from...

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