Folktales of Norway

Front Cover
University of Chicago Press, 1964 - History - 284 pages
3 Reviews
Often lacking the clear episodic structure of folktales about talking animals and magic objects, legends grow from retellings of personal experiences. Christiansen isolated some seventy-seven legend types, and many of these are represented here in absorbing stories of St. Olaf, hidden treasures, witches, and spirits of the air, water, and earth. The ugly, massively strong, but slow-witted trolls are familiar to English-speaking readers. Less well-known, but the subject of an enormous number of legends, are the more manlike yet sinister "huldre-folk" who live in houses and try to woo human girls. These tales reflect the wildness of Norway, its mountains, forests, lakes, and sea, and the stalwart character of its sparse population.

"The translation is excellent, retaining the traditional Norwegian style . . . the tales themselves will also appeal to the interested layman."—Library Journal

  

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Review: Folktales of Norway

User Review  - jack - Goodreads

a cool little collection that i picked up for a camping trip. wide variety of tales that kept me entertained. Read full review

Review: Folktales of Norway

User Review  - jack - Goodreads

a cool little collection that i picked up for a camping trip. wide variety of tales that kept me entertained. Read full review

Contents

I
4
II
5
III
6
IV
8
V
9
VI
10
VII
11
VIII
12
LI
100
LII
101
LIII
103
LIV
104
LV
105
LVI
106
LVII
109
LVIII
111

IX
14
X
15
XI
17
XII
18
XIII
19
XIV
21
XV
23
XVI
24
XVII
28
XVIII
29
XIX
31
XX
33
XXI
34
XXII
36
XXIII
37
XXIV
38
XXV
40
XXVI
42
XXVII
46
XXVIII
48
XXIX
49
XXX
54
XXXI
55
XXXII
56
XXXIII
62
XXXIV
68
XXXV
69
XXXVI
71
XXXVII
76
XXXVIII
78
XXXIX
82
XL
83
XLI
85
XLII
87
XLIII
88
XLIV
90
XLV
92
XLVI
93
XLVII
94
XLVIII
95
XLIX
96
L
97
LIX
114
LX
116
LXI
118
LXII
120
LXIII
122
LXIV
124
LXV
126
LXVI
127
LXVII
128
LXVIII
129
LXIX
131
LXX
133
LXXI
134
LXXII
138
LXXIII
139
LXXIV
140
LXXV
141
LXXVI
142
LXXVII
148
LXXVIII
154
LXXIX
160
LXXX
165
LXXXI
170
LXXXII
176
LXXXIII
184
LXXXIV
187
LXXXV
194
LXXXVI
207
LXXXVII
209
LXXXVIII
214
LXXXIX
229
XC
235
XCI
244
XCII
253
XCIII
260
XCIV
264
XCV
267
XCVI
270
XCVII
271
XCVIII
273
XCIX
276
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xiv - We miss the song of birds, the modest odour of wild-flowers, and the balmy fragrance of the pine forest. The Swedes are more stiff, and their style is more like that of a chronicle than a tale. The Germans are simple, hearty, and rather comic than humorous ; and M. Moe...
Page xiv - Norske Bonder, who call a spade a spade, and who burn tallow, not wax ; and yet in no collection of tales is the general tone so chaste, are the great principles of morality better worked out, and right and wrong kept so steadily in sight.
Page xiv - ... must have derived them from some common tradition." The tales of all races have a character and manner of their own. Among the Hindoos the straight stem of the story is overhung with a network of imagery which reminds one of the parasitic growth of a tropical forest. Among the Arabs the tale is more elegant, pointed with a moral. . . . Among the Italians it is bright, light, dazzling, and swift. Among the French we have passed from the woods, and fields, and hills, to my lady's boudoir — rose-pink...
Page xiv - Gottingen, 1828, pp. 168-70. done, because they may be left to speak for themselves, and must stand or fall by their own words and actions. The tales of all races have a character and manner of their own. Among the Hindoos the straight stem of the story is overhung with a network of imagery which reminds one of the parasitic growth of a tropical forest. Among the Arabs the tale is more elegant, pointed with a moral, and adorned with tropes and episodes. Among the Italians it is bright, light, dazzling,...
Page vii - Oscar J. Falnes, National Romanticism in Norway (New York: Columbia University Press, 1933); and Ottar Dahl, Norsk Historieforskning i 19.
Page xxxiii - spirits" according to the sphere in which they operate is open to the qualification that the classes often overlap, so that one is left with the impression that all these beings belong to the same family. In the Norwegian tradition this family group is covered by the term huldre-folk, meaning the "hidden people.

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