Alaska: Narrative, glaciers, natives (Google eBook)

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Doubleday, Page, 1901 - Alaska
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Page 117 - ... fond, but none the less will the studious observer see the underlying harmony the general trend of the islands in the direction of the flow of the main ice-mantle from the mountains of the Coast Range, more or less varied by subordinate foothill ridges and mountains. Furthermore, all the islands, great and small, as well as the headlands and promontories of the mainland, are seen to have a rounded, over-rubbed appearance produced by the over-sweeping ice-flood during the period of greatest...
Page 19 - Before us was a cruise of several thousand miles, one thousand of which was through probably the finest scenery of the kind in the world that can be seen from the deck of a ship the scenery of fiords and mountain-locked bays and arms of the sea. Day after day a panorama unrolls before us with features that might have been gathered from the Highlands of the Hudson, from Lake George, from the Thousand Islands, the Saguenay, or the Rangeley Lakes in Maine, with the addition of towering snowcapped...
Page 19 - Saguenay, and the Rangeley Lakes in Maine, with the addition of towering snowcapped peaks thrown in for a background. The edge of this part of the continent for a thousand miles has been broken into fragments, small and great, as by the stroke of some earth-cracking hammer, and into the openings and channels thus formed the sea flows freely, often at a depth of from one to two thousand feet.
Page xxi - ... while adding to the interest and pleasure of the expedition, would gather useful information and distribute it for the benefit of others." By the advice of his physician he obtained the aid of Dr. C. Hart Merriam, chief of the Biological Survey of the US Department of Agriculture, in carrying out this plan. The outcome is succinctly stated in the introduction (pp. xxv-xxxi) by Dr. Merriam, who has most capably 1 "Alaska. Harriman Alaska...
Page 38 - Many of the rocks and stones on the surface were sharp and angular, others were smooth and rounded. These latter had evidently passed as it were through the gizzard of the huge monster, while the others had been carried on its back. A walk of a mile or more brought us much nearer the glacier's front, and standing high on the bank of the moraine we could observe it at our leisure. The roar that followed the discharge of ice from its front constantly suggested the blasting in mines or in railroad cuts....
Page 94 - I longed to spend some days there in the privacy of its green solitudes, following its limpid trout streams, climbing its lofty peaks, and listening to the music of the longspur. I had seen much, but had been intimate with little ; now if I could only have a few days of that kind of intimacy with this new nature which the saunterer, the camperout, the stroller through fields in the summer twilight has, I should be more content; but in the afternoon the ship was off into Bering Sea, headed for the...
Page 36 - ... that here is indeed a new kind of Niagara, a cataract the like of which we have not before seen, a mighty congealed river that discharges into the bay intermittently in ice avalanches that shoot down its own precipitous front. The mass of ice below the water line is vastly greater than that above, and when the upper portions fall away, enormous bergs are liberated and rise up from the bottom. They rise slowly and majestically, like huge monsters of the deep, lifting themselves up to a height...
Page 44 - ... fragment of rock hung on the very edge, ready to be deposited upon the ridge, windrows of soil and gravel and boulders were clinging to the margin of the ice, but while I stayed not a pebble moved, all was silence and inertia. And I could look down between the glacier and the polished mountain-side; they were not in contact; the hand of the sculptor was raised, as it were, but he did not strike while I was around. In front of me upon the glacier for many miles was a perfect wilderness of crevasses,...
Page 56 - There is sublimity in the sight of a summer thunder-head with its great white and dun convolutions rising up for miles against the sky, but there is more in the...
Page 82 - Uyak that afternoon when we began to see a few scattered spruce-trees, then patches of forest in the valley bottoms. At one point we passed near a large natural park. It looked as if a landscape gardener might have been employed to grade and shape the ground, and plant it with grass and trees in just the right proportion.