New Year's Evil

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Pocket Books, 1991 - Detective and mystery stories, American - 214 pages
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NANCY DREW heads for Quebec City to investigate sabotage on the set of the romantic TV thriller "Dangerous Loves." But the action behind the scenes is far more chilling than anything on camera. Somebody is secretly determined to turn the film into a flop. The movie's title adds an ominous twist to the case when Bess falls for its very attractive star -- one of Nancy's prime suspects!
Meanwhile . . .
FRANK and JOE HARDY are also in Quebec for the Winter Carnival's spectacular auto ice-racing event. But they soon find themselves in a race of their own -- to catch a murderer! Racing champion Andre Junot has turned up dead. At the same time a photographer from the movie set has turned up missing. Nancy, Frank, and Joe form a single resolution: infiltrate the criminal conspiracy...
"Tourist Trap"

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About the author (1991)

Carolyn Keene was the pseudonym that Mildred Wirt Benson and Walter Karig used to write Nancy Drew books. The idea of Nancy Drew came from Edward Stratemeyer in 1929. He also had other series, that included the Hardy Boys, but he died in 1930 before the Nancy Drew series became famous. His daughters, Harriet and Edna, inherited his company and maintained Nancy Drew having Mildred Wirt Benson, the original Carolyn Keene, as the principal ghostwriter. During the Depression, they asked Benson to take a pay cut and she refused, which is when Karig wrote the books. Karig's Nancy Drew books were Nancy's Mysterious Letter, The Sign of the Twisted Candles, and Password to Larkspur Lane. He was fired from writing more books because of his refusal to honor the request that he keep his work as Carolyn Keene a secret. He allowed the Library of Congress to learn of his authorship and his name appeared on their catalog cards. Afterwards, they rehired Benson and she wrote until her last Nancy Drew book (#30) was written in 1953, Clue of the Velvet Mask. Harriet and Edna Stratemeyer also contributed to the Nancy Drew series. Edna wrote plot outlines for several of the early books and Harriet, who claimed to be the sole author, had actually outlined and edited nearly all the volumes written by Benson. The Stratemeyer Syndicate had begun to make its writers sign contracts that prohibited them from claiming any credit for their works, but Benson never denied her writing books for the series. After Harriet's death in 1982, Simon and Schuster became the owners of the Stratemeyer Syndicate properties and in 1994, publicly recognized Benson for her work at a Nancy Drew conference at her alma mater, the University of Iowa. Now, Nancy Drew has several ghostwriters and artists that have contributed to her more recent incarnations.

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