On the Construction of Fire Engines and Apparatus: The Training of Firemen, and the Method of Proceeding in Cases of Fire ... (Google eBook)

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Bell, 1830 - Fire prevention - 138 pages
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Page 82 - I reached the top of the stair, the smoke was rolling in thick heavy masses, which prevented me from seeing six inches before me. I immediately got down on the floor ; above which, for a space of about eight inches, the air seemed to be remarkably clear and bright. I could distinctly see the feet of the tables and other furniture in the apartment ; the flames in this space burning as vivid and distinct as the flame of a candle, while all above, the smoke was so thick, that the eye could not penetrate...
Page 82 - When the hose is attached and the engine filled with water, the man who holds the director, accompanied by another, should get so near the fire, inside the house, that the water from the director may strike the burning materials. If he cannot accomplish this standing, he must get down on his hands and knees, and creep forward, those behind handing up the hose. A stratum of fresh air is almost always to be depended on from six to twelve inches from the floor, so that if the air be not respirable to...
Page 62 - ... by itself, or if access cannot be had to the roof by means of the adjoining houses, the lead bullet, with the cord attached, is thrown over the house by means of the cross-bow ; to this cord a stronger one is attached, and drawn over the house by means of the former ; a single chain is then attached, and drawn over in like manner ; and to this last is attached the chain-ladder, which, on being raised to the roof, the firemen ascend, and proceed as before directed.
Page 60 - ... of 3 ounce weight attached to one end, and carefully wound upon a wooden cone, 7 inches high, and 7 inches broad at the base, turned with a spiral groove, to prevent the cord slipping when wound upon it ; also a small pulley with a claw attached to it, and a cord reeved through it of sufficient strength to bear the weight of the ladder. In order to prevent the sides of the ladder from collapsing, the steps are made of copper or iron tube, fastened by a piece of cord passed through the iron tube...
Page 48 - The form of this helmet was taken from the war-helmet of the New Zealanders, with the addition of the hind flap of leather. In front, the helmet has a brass plate, and behind there is a projecting flap of leather to prevent burning matter, melted lead, water or rubbish getting into the neck of the wearer. The captains...
Page 132 - September, were : He says : '' In examining the above table it will be observed " that serious fires decrease as the number of alarms increase. The " cause of so many false alarms in 1828-9 was that a considerable " number of fires having been observed to arise from foul chimneys, " the firemen were sent to every one from which the slightest
Page 83 - The great point to which every thing ought to be made subservient is, that the water on its discharge from the director should actually strike the burning materials. This cannot be too often or too anxiously inculcated on every one connected with a fire-engine establishment. Every other method, not having this for its grand object, will, in nine cases out of ten, utterly fail ; and upon the degree of attention paid to this point depends almost entirely the question, as to the amount of damage the...
Page 65 - ... remedy being too late, is applied in vain, and the triumphant element involves in ruin all the adjacent premises, with the property originally rescued. The New York fire was a melancholy instance of this kind. Mr. Braidwood in his excellent work on fires and fireengines, very justly remarks, that " persons may often be seen toiling like galley-slaves at operations which a moment's reflection would show were utterly useless. I have seen tables, chairs, and every article of furniture that would...
Page 94 - dreadful losses by fire" and the "great exertions" made to extinguish it, all the notice would be, such a place took fire, the engines arrived, and it was extinguished. It would be useless for me to enter into the details of a plan which I have little hope of ever seeing realized.

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