Sir Lucius Cary, late lord viscount of Falkland: His discourse of infallibility, with an answer to it: and his lordships reply (Google eBook)

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Printed by G. Dawson for I. Hardesty, 1651 - Religion - 296 pages
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Page 192 - If we let him thus alone, all men will believe on him ; and the Romans will come and take away both our place and nation.
Page 118 - I ought to submit it, is still to follow reason, and not to quit her. And by what else is it that you examine what the apostles taught, when you examine that by ancient tradition, and ancient tradition by a present testimony ? Yet when I speak thus of finding the Truth by Reason, I intend not to exclude the Grace of God, which I doubt not (for as much as is necessary to salvation) is ready to concur to our instruction ; as the sun is to our sight, if we by a wilful winking chuse not to 2 Ibid., p.
Page iv - This is a work of some importance in theological controversy, the general argument being that " to those who follow their reason in the interpretation of the Scriptures God will either give his grace for assistance to find the truth or his pardon if they miss it.
Page xxiii - ... his concluding paragraph : — " To conclude, if they can prove that the Scripture may be a certainer teacher of truth to them than to us, so that they may conclude the infallibility of the Church out of it( and we nothing ; if they can prove the Churches infallibility to be a sufficient guide for him, that doubts which is the Church, and cannot examine that (for want of learning) by her chief marke, which is conformity with the ancients...
Page xiv - Turkish means — at least, it must breed doubts, that if the religion had always remained the same, it would not now be defended by ways so contrary to those by which at first it was propagated. I desire recrimination may not be used ; for though it be true that Calvin had done it, and the Church of England a little (which is a little too much), yet she (confessing she may err) is not so chargeable with any fault as those which pretend they cannot, and so will be sure never to mend it.
Page xvi - They grant no man is an heretic that believes not his heresy obstinately ; and if he be no heretic, he may sure be saved. It is not then certain damnation for any man to deny the infallibility of the Church of Rome, but for him only that denies it obstinately.
Page xxiii - ... It would be tedious to follow in further detail an argument which has now become conventional ; but the author thus summarises it with admirable lucidity in his concluding paragraph : — " To conclude, if they can prove that the Scripture may be a certainer teacher of truth to them than to us, so that they may conclude the infallibility of the Church out of it( and we nothing...
Page xxiv - ... but upon the merits of the argument, and in a reasonable temper "remembering that Truth in likelyhood is where her author God was, in the still voice, and not the loud wind".
Page xiii - I am sure the Christian religion's chiefest glory is, that it increaseth by being persecuted ; and having that advantage of the Mohammedan, methinks it should be to take ill care of Christianity to hold it up by Turkish means — at least, it must breed doubts, that if the religion had always remained the same, it would not now be defended by ways so contrary to those by which at first it was propagated. I desire recrimination may not be used ; for though it be true that Calvin had done it, and the...
Page xvi - I cannot see why he should be saved because by reason of his parents' belief, or the religion of the country, or some such accident, the truth was offered to his understanding, when, had the contrary been offered, he would have received that. And the other damned that...

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