Earth House Hold: Technical Notes & Queries to Fellow Dharma Revolutionaries (Google eBook)

Front Cover
New Directions Publishing, 1969 - Fiction - 143 pages
13 Reviews
"As a poet," Snyder tells us, "I hold the most archaic values on earth. They go back to the late Paleolithic; the fertility of the soil, the magic of animals, the power-vision in solitude, the terrifying intuition and rebirth; the love and ecstasy of the dance, the common work of the tribe." He develops, as replacement for shattered social structures. a concept of tribal tradition which could lead to "growth and enlightenment in self-disciplined freedom. Whatever it is or ever was in any other culture can be reconstructed from the unconscious through meditation...the coming revolution will close the circle and link us in many ways with the most creative aspects of our archaic past."
  

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Review: Earth House Hold

User Review  - Robin - Goodreads

I'm a big fan of Gary Snyder's poems about man in nature, and particularly fond of hearing him recite his own poetry. This early book is mostly prose. It's partly a journal of Snyder's travels, his ... Read full review

Review: Earth House Hold

User Review  - Nancy - Goodreads

Incredible. Read full review

Contents

Lookouts Journal
1
Review
25
Japan First Time Around
31
Spring Sesshin at Shokokuji
44
Tanker Notes
54
Record of the Life of the Chan Master Pochang
69
A Journey to Rishikesh and Hardwar
83
Buddhism and the Coming Revolution
90
Glacier Peak Wilderness Area
94
Passage to More Than India
103
Why Tribe
113
Poetry and the Primitive
117
Dharma Queries
131
SuwanoSe Island and the Banyan Ashram
135
Copyright

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Page 150 - I hold the most archaic values on earth. They go back to the Neolithic: the fertility of the soil, the magic of animals, the power-vision in solitude, the terrifying initiation and rebirth, the love and ecstasy of the dance, the common work of the tribe.

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About the author (1969)

Steve Hogan is a freelance writer whose work has appeared in "Interview," "Small Press," and elsewhere. Lee Hudson, a writer and researcher, was the founder and first director of the New York City Mayor's Office for the Lesbian and Gay Community. Both live in New York.

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