Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of the State of New York (Google eBook)

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1911
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Page 27 - I would be true, for there are those who trust me ; I would be pure, for there are those who care; I would be strong, for there is much to suffer; I would be brave, for there is much to dare. I would be friend...
Page 88 - ... per cent, per annum, payable semi-annually on the first days of April and October in each year.
Page 119 - Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind, and with all thy strength, and thy neighbor as thyself...
Page 27 - I WOULD be true, for there are those who trust me ; I would be pure, for there arc those who care ; I would be strong, for there is much to suffer ; I would be brave, for there is much to dare.
Page 4 - A lodge of free and accepted masons duly chartered by and installed according to the general rules and regulations of the grand lodge of free and accepted masons of the state of New York; 2.
Page 367 - They fear not life's rough storms to brave, Since thou art near, and strong to save ; Nor shudder e'en at death's dark wave ; Because they cling to thee.
Page 17 - No star shines brighter than the kingly man, Who nobly earns whatever crown he wears, Who grandly conquers, or as grandly dies; And the white banner of his manhood bears, Through all the years uplifted to the skies!
Page 23 - At the close of the war he took up the study of law, and was graduated from the Albany Law School and admitted to the Bar in 1866.
Page 430 - A confession of a defendant, whether in the course of judicial proceedings or to a private person, can be given in evidence against him, unless made under the influence of fear produced by threats, or unless made upon a stipulation of the district: attorney, that he shall not be prosecuted therefor ; but is not sufficient to warrant his conviction, without additional proof that the crime charged has been committed.
Page 247 - In most of the States a plurality of the votes cast determines the election. In others, as to some elections, a majority ; but in determining upon a majority or plurality, the blank votes, if any, are not to be counted ; and a candidate may therefore be chosen without receiving a plurality or majority of voices of those who actually participated in the election.

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