The Oregon Trail

Front Cover
U of Nebraska Press, 1994 - History - 833 pages
2 Reviews
Francis Parkman was a 23-year-old scion of a prominent Boston family when he decided to write the history of the struggle of French and English for domination of the North American continent. In order to learn firsthand about the Indians of the Plains, he prepared himself with guides, supplies, and information, setting out from Westport, Missouri, in spring 1846 and returning that September. From that trip emerged one of the seminal books of American literature, The Oregon Trail.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - MrsLee - LibraryThing

Written in 1847, this is an eye witness account of the prairie and the natives who lived there. Unlike our romantic view of native life, this is somewhat disdainful, and yet he admires them in a way ... Read full review

Great biographical sketch

User Review  - Consolation - Walmart

It is a book that tells a lot about the author's beliefs. Read full review

Contents

Introduction to the Bison Book Edition
Map of Parkmans Route in 1846
vii
CHAFTER PAGH I THE FRONTIER
1
BREAKING THE ICE
10
FORT LEAVEN WORTH
25
JUMPING OFF
29
THE B1o BLUE
41
THE PLATTE AND THE DESERT
55
THE OGILLALLAH VILLAGE
204
THE HUNTING CAMP
229
THE TRAPPERS
258
THE BLACK HILLS
262
A MOUNTAIN HUNT
274
PASSAGE OF THE MOUNTAINS
289
THE LONELY JOURNEY
306
THE PUEBLO AND BENTS FORT
328

THE BUFFALO
70
TAKING FRENCH LEAVE
86
SCENES AT FORT LARAMIE
104
THE WAR PARTIES
121
SCENES AT THE CAMP
147
The Oregon Trail i
158
ILLLUCK
168
HUNTING INDIANS
178
TETE ROUGE THE VOLUNTEER
337
CHAPTER PAGE
343
DOWN THE ARKANSAS
384
THE SETTLEMENTS
402
Notes
415
Bibliography
711
Index
730
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

E. N. Feltskog is a professor of English at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

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