Race and Nation: Ethnic Systems in the Modern World

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Paul R. Spickard
Psychology Press, 2005 - History - 392 pages
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Race and Nation is the first book to compare the racial and ethnic systems that have developed around the world. It is the creation of nineteen scholars who are experts on locations as far-flung as China, Jamaica, Eritrea, Brazil, Germany, Punjab, and South Africa. The contributing historians, sociologists, anthropologists, political scientists, and scholars of literary and cultural studies have engaged in an ongoing conversation, honing a common set of questions that dig to the heart of racial and ethnic groups and systems.
Guided by those questions, they have created the first book that explores the similarities, differences, and the relationships among the ways that race and ethnicity have worked in the modern world. In so doing they have created a model for how to write world history that is detailed in its expertise, yet also manages broad comparisons.
  

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Contents

Founding and Sustaining Myths
8
The Satisfactions of Racial Thinking
33
Mestizaje and the Ethnicization of Race in Latin America
53
Citizenship and Sociology
69
Race and National Identity
87
Memories of Japanese Identity and Racial Hierarchy
115
Tunisia Algeria
135
Algerians Islam
171
Racial
239
Genealogy Identity
257
Ethnicity and the Vietnamese
273
A Race Apart? The Paradox of Sikh Ethnicity
299
Ideology
319
Eritreas Identity as a Cultural Crossroads
337
Notes on the Discourse
355
Bibliography
365

Politics of Membership
195
Building a Bicultural Future
215

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About the author (2005)

Paul Spickard is Professor of History at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the author of, among other books, Racial Thinking in the United States and A Global History of Christians.

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