Plato and the Question of Beauty

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Indiana University Press, 2008 - Philosophy - 150 pages
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Drew A. Hyland, one of Continental philosophy's keenest interpreters of Plato, takes up the question of beauty in three Platonic dialogues, the Hippias Major, Symposium, and Phaedrus. What Plato meant by beauty is not easily characterized, and Hyland's close readings show that Plato ultimately gives up on the possibility of a definition. Plato's failure, however, tells us something important about beauty—that it cannot be reduced to logos. Exploring questions surrounding love, memory, and ideal form, Hyland draws out the connections between beauty, the possibility of philosophy, and philosophical living. This new reading of Plato provides a serious investigation into the meaning of beauty and places it at the very heart of philosophy.

  

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Contents

The Question of Beauty in the Symposium
27
The Question of Beauty in the Phaedrus
64
The Second and Seventh Letters
91
The Critique of Rhetoric and Writing in the Phaedrus
115
Notes
137
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About the author (2008)

Drew A. Hyland is Charles A. Dana Professor of Philosophy at Trinity College. He is editor (with John Panteleimon Manoussakis) of Heidegger and the Greeks (IUP, 2006).

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