The Psychology of Revolution

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Plain Label Books, Oct 31, 2006 - History - 340 pages
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When renowned French sociologist GUSTAVE LE BON (1841-1931), who pioneered the field of mass psychology, took a fresh, scientific look at the subject of revolution-and in particular, the French Revolution-he stripped away legend and illusion to find the core reality. In this profound and insightful work, a replica of the 1913 edition, he explores the mob mentality of revolutionaries-religious, scientific, and political-examines the motives of their leaders, and discusses how new forms of democratic belief and practice arise from popular movements. Students of history and the human mind alike will find it a fascinating read. ALSO FROM COSIMO: Le Bon's The Crowd: A Study of the Popular Mind
  

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Contents

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Popular passages

Page 41 - Those of mankind that are predestinated unto life, God, before the foundation of the world was laid, according to His eternal and immutable purpose, and the secret counsel and good pleasure of His will, hath chosen in Christ unto everlasting glory...
Page 41 - These angels and men, thus predestinated and foreordained, are particularly and unchangeably designed ; and their number is so certain and definite, that it cannot be either increased or diminished.
Page 100 - The French people recognize the existence of the Supreme Being and the immortality of the soul.
Page 42 - As God hath appointed the elect unto glory, so hath he, by the eternal and most free purpose of his will, foreordained all the means thereunto. Wherefore, they who are elected, being fallen in Adam, are redeemed by Christ, are effectually called unto faith in Christ, by his Spirit working in due season, are justified, adopted, sanctified, and kept by his power, through faith unto salvation. Neither are any other redeemed by Christ, effectually called, justified, adopted, sanctified and saved, but...
Page 114 - Man, as a part of a multitude, is a very different being from the same man as an isolated individual.
Page 31 - that revolutions have never taken place, and will never take place, save with the aid of an important faction of the army."6 This aid may originate from the failure of the ruling classes to call out the troops; from the failure of the officers to obey the orders; from the refusal of the troops to fight the revolutionaries, either by standing idly by, by fraternizing with the revolutionaries, or by...
Page 23 - Revolutions, extends his usage to include "all sudden transformations, or transformations apparently sudden whether of beliefs, ideas, or doctrines.
Page 100 - Atheism is aristocratic. The idea of a great Being who watches over oppressed innocence and punishes triumphant crime is essentially the idea of the people.
Page 80 - Laving in laborious silence, it is ignored by historians. The second category, which plays a capital part in all national disturbances, consists of a subversive social residue dominated by a criminal mentality. Degenerates of alcoholism and poverty, thieves, beggars, destitute "casuals," indifferent workers without employISO mcnt these constitute the dangerous bulk of the armies of insurrection.
Page 25 - How broad his conception is may be gathered from the following criticism which he makes of those who hold to the strictly political aspects: The sudden political revolutions which strike the historian most forcibly are often the least important. The great revolutions are those of manners and thought. The true revolutions, those which transform the destinies of people, are most frequently accomplished so slowly that the historians can hardly point to their beginnings. Scientific revolutions are by...

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