The Constitutional History of England from the Accession of Henry VII to the Death of George II (Google eBook)

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Harper & Bros., 1849 - Constitutional history - 737 pages
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Page 365 - So ye shall not pollute the land wherein ye are : for blood it defileth the land : and the land cannot be cleansed of the blood that is shed therein, but by the blood of him that shed it.
Page 211 - That the liberties, franchises, privileges, and jurisdictions of Parliament are the ancient and undoubted birthright and inheritance of the subjects of England...
Page 422 - I, AB, do declare that it is not lawful upon any pretence whatsoever to take arms against the king, and that I do abhor that traitorous position of taking arms by his authority against his person or against those that are commissioned by him...
Page 224 - Majesty, that no man hereafter be compelled to make or yield any gift, loan, benevolence. tax, or such like charge, without common consent by Act of Parliament; and that none be called to make answer, or take such oath, or to give attendance, or be confined, or otherwise molested or disquieted concerning the same, or for refusal thereof; and that no freeman, in any such manner as is before mentioned, be imprisoned or detained...
Page 253 - The law knows no such king-yoking policy. The law is itself an old and trusty servant of the king's ; it is his instrument or means which he useth to govern his people by : I never read nor heard that lex was rex ; but it is common and most true that rex is lex.
Page 178 - What cause we your poor Commons have to watch over our privileges is manifest in itself to all men. The prerogatives of princes may easily and do daily grow; the privileges of the subject are for the most part at an everlasting stand. They may be by good providence and care preserved, but being once lost are not recovered but with much disquiet.
Page 415 - ... a Liberty to Tender Consciences and that no man shall be disquieted or called in question for differences of opinion in matters of religion which do not disturb the peace of the kingdom...
Page 442 - That he hath advised and procured divers of his Majesty's subjects to be imprisoned, against law, in remote islands, garrisons and other places, thereby to prevent them from the benefit of the law, and to introduce precedents for imprisoning any other of his Majesty's subjects in like manner.
Page 192 - It is atheism and blasphemy to dispute what God can do; good Christians content themselves with His will revealed in His Word, so it is presumption and high contempt in a subject to dispute what a King can do, or say that a King cannot do this or that, but | rest in that which is the King's will revealed in his law.
Page 421 - I am rightly informed, was so insolent as to justify all he had done, acknowledging no supreme power in England but a Parliament, and many things to that purpose. You have had a true account of all, and if he has given new occasion to be hanged, certainly he is too dangerous a man to let live, if we can honestly put him out of the way.

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