Understanding Fundamentalism: Christian, Islamic, and Jewish Movements

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Rowman Altamira, Jan 1, 2001 - Religion - 181 pages
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Fundamentalism conjures up in the popular imagination images of violence, intolerance, literal readings of ancient scriptures, anachronistic ideas of gender and sexual ethics. Understanding Fundamentalism seeks to provide fuller, more accurate pictures of these religious reactions against the modern secular world. Comparing Christian, Islamic, and Jewish fundamentalist movements, anthropologist Richard Antoun shows how all three share common characteristics. In each tradition, fundamentalists seek purity in an impure world, attempt to make the ancient past relevant to their contemporary situation, look to move religion out of the worship center and into every aspect of life, and actively struggle against the aspects of the modern world they regard as evil. A glossary, Antoun's readable style, and an extended set of conversations with a Muslim fundamentalist make the concepts readily accessible for beginning students. For classes in religious studies, anthropology or sociology of religion, Understanding Fundamentalism brings a balanced introduction to these often misunderstood religious activists.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Complexity of Scripturalism
37
The Past in the Present Traditioning the ProofText and the Covenant
55
Three Strategies in the Quest for Purity
73
Activism and Totalism
85
Selective Modernization and Controlled Acculturation
117
The Prophets Way Conversations with a Muslim Fundamentalist
133
Conclusion
153
Glossary
163
Suggestions for Further Reading
169
Index
175
About the Author
181
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

DAISY HILSE DWYER is a a practicing attorney in New York City, with specializations in corporate and transnational law. She taught Middle East Studies and anthropology of law at Columbia University from 1973-1982, and also taught at the Columbia University School of Law. She is the author of "Images and Self Images" (1978) and is the coauthor, with Judith Bruce, of "A Home Divided "(1988).

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