History of Education in New Jersey, Issues 1-3 (Google eBook)

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1899 - Education - 344 pages
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Page 297 - ... without excluding other scientific and classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such manner as the Legislatures of the States may respectively prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions in life.
Page 286 - George the Second, by the Grace of God of Great Britain, France and Ireland King, Defender of the Faith, etc. : To all to whom these presents shall come Greeting...
Page 162 - Where low-browed baseness wafts perfume to pride. No ! Men, high-minded men, With powers as far above dull brutes endued, In forest, brake or den, As beasts excel cold rocks and brambles rude ; Men who their duties know, But know their rights, and, knowing, dare maintain, Prevent the long-aimed blow, And crush the tyrant while they rend the chain, These constitute a State ; And sovereign law, that State's collected will, O'er thrones and globes elate Sits empress, crowning good, repressing...
Page 16 - The concessions and agreements of the proprietors, freeholders and inhabitants of the province of West New Jersey in America.
Page 40 - The General Assembly shall provide for the maintenance and support of a thorough and efficient system of public schools, wherein all the children of this Commonwealth, above the age of six years, may be educated, and shall appropriate at least one million dollars each year for that purpose.
Page 198 - Enough, if something from our hands have power To live, and act, and serve the future hour; And if, as toward the silent tomb we go, Through love, through hope, and faith's transcendent dower, We feel that we are greater than we know.
Page 241 - That the only representatives of the people of these colonies are persons chosen therein by themselves, and that no taxes ever have been, or can be constitutionally imposed on them, but by their respective legislatures.
Page 183 - These libraries have improved the general conversation of the Americans, made the common tradesmen and farmers as intelligent as most gentlemen from other countries, and perhaps have contributed in some degree to the stand so generally made throughout the Colonies in defence of their privileges.
Page 162 - We utterly repudiate as unworthy, not of freemen only, but of men, the narrow notion that there is to be an education for the poor, as such.
Page 14 - They required that a school should be erected in every parish, for the instruction of youth in the principles of religion, grammar, and the Latin tongue. They proposed that a college should be erected in every " notable town," in which logic and rhetoric should be taught, along with the learned languages.