Selections from the poetry of Robert Herrick, ed (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Ginn & company, 1895 - 200 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Related books

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 34 - GATHER ye rosebuds while ye may, Old Time is still a-flying; And this same flower that smiles to-day, To-morrow will be dying. The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun, The higher he's a-getting, The sooner will his race be run, And nearer he's to setting. That age is best which is the first, When youth and blood are warmer; But being spent, the worse and worst Times still succeed the former. Then be not coy, but use your time, And while ye may, go marry; For, having...
Page 110 - I've none, A cock I have to sing how day draws on : I have A maid, my Prue, by good luck sent, To save That little Fates me gave or lent...
Page 34 - TO THE VIRGINS, TO MAKE MUCH OF TIME Gather ye rosebuds while ye may, Old time is still a-flying, And this same flower that smiles to-day, Tomorrow will be dying. The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun, The higher he's a-getting, The sooner will his race be run, And nearer he's to setting. That age is best which is the first, When youth and blood are warmer; 10 But being spent, the worse, and worst Times still succeed the former.
Page 34 - That age is best, which is the first, When youth and blood are warmer; But being spent, the worse, and worst Times still succeed the former. Then be not coy, but use your time, And while ye may, go marry: For having lost but once your prime, You may for ever tarry.
Page 27 - There's not a budding boy or girl this day But is got up, and gone to bring in May. A deal of youth, ere this, is come Back, and with white-thorn laden home. Some have...
Page 3 - I sing of times trans-shifting, and I write How roses first came red and lilies white; I write of groves, of twilights, and I sing The Court of Mab, and of the Fairy King; I write of hell ; I sing (and ever shall) Of heaven, and hope to have it after all.
Page 77 - SONG. Good morrow to the day so fair ; Good morning, sir, to you ; Good morrow to mine own torn hair, Bedabbled with the dew. Good morning to this primrose too ; Good morrow to each maid ; That will with flowers the tomb bestrew Wherein my Love is laid. Ah ! woe is me, woe, woe is me, Alack and well-a-day ! For pity, sir, find out that bee, Which bore my Love away.
Page 101 - Since ghost there is none to affright thee. Let not the dark thee cumber ; What though the moon does slumber? The stars of the night Will lend thee their light, Like tapers clear without number.
Page 26 - May. Rise and put on your foliage, and be seen To come forth, like the spring-time, fresh and green, And sweet as Flora. Take no care For jewels for your gown or hair: Fear not; the leaves will strew Gems in abundance upon you: Besides, the childhood of the day has kept, Against you come, some orient pearls unwept.
Page 27 - Come, let us go, while we are in our prime, And take the harmless folly of the time! We shall grow old apace, and die Before we know our liberty. Our life is short, and our days run As fast away as does the sun.

References from web pages

I. Cavalier Lyrists: Bibliography. Vol. 7. Cavalier and Puritan ...
Selections from the poetry of Robert Herrick. Ed. Hale, ee, jun. Athenaeum Press Series. Boston, Mass., 1895. Hesperides. Ed. Pollard, aw, with a preface by ...
www.bartleby.com/ 217/ 0100.html

Bibliographic information