Architecture, Part 1 (Google eBook)

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H. Howe, 1831 - Architecture - 74 pages
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Contents

I
vii
II
11
III
30
IV
43
V
54

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Page 14 - The cloud-capt towers, the gorgeous palaces, The solemn temples, the great globe itself; * Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve, And, like the baseless fabric of a vision, Leave not a wreck behind.
Page 10 - And they said, Go to, let us build us a city, and a tower, whose top may reach unto heaven; and let us make us a name, lest we be scattered abroad upon the face of the whole earth.
Page 40 - How reverend is the face of this tall pile, Whose ancient pillars rear their marble heads, To bear aloft its arched and ponderous roof, By its own weight made stedfast and immoveable, Looking tranquillity. It strikes an awe And terror on my aching sight ; the tombs And monumental caves of death look cold, And shoot a dullness to my trembling heart.
Page x - All things to Man's delightful use; the roof Of thickest covert was inwoven shade, Laurel and myrtle, and what higher grew Of firm and fragrant leaf; on either side Acanthus, and each odorous bushy shrub, Fenced up the verdant wall; each beauteous flower, Iris all hues, roses, and jessamine, Reared high their flourished heads between, and wrought Mosaic; under foot the violet, Crocus, and hyacinth, with rich inlay Broidered the ground, more coloured than with stone Of costliest emblem; other creature...
Page x - On to their blissful bower.. It was a place Chosen by the Sovran Planter, when he framed All things to man's delightful use ; the roof, Of thickest covert, was inwoven shade, Laurel and myrtle, and what higher grew 695 Of firm and fragrant leaf...
Page x - ... inwoven shade Laurel and myrtle, and what higher grew Of firm and fragrant leaf; on either side Acanthus, and each odorous bushy shrub, Fenced up the verdant wall; each beauteous flower, Iris all hues, roses, and jessamine, Reared, high their flourished heads between, and wrought Mosaic; underfoot the violet, Crocus, and hyacinth with rich inlay Broidered the ground, more colored than with stone Of costliest emblem: other creature here, Beast, bird, insect, or worm, durst enter none: Such was...
Page 35 - Conceive the burst of surprise at suddenly coming upon a stupendous temple, within a large open court, hewn out of the solid rock, with all its parts perfect and beautiful, standing proudly alone upon its native bed, and detached from the neighbouring mountain by a spacious area all round, nearly 250 feet deep, and 150 feet broad : this unrivalled fane, rearing its rocky head to a height of nearly 100 feet its length about 145 feet, by 62 broad...
Page 56 - And visit other lands, that thou mayest view These varied scenes so beautiful and new ? Thou dost not know how sad it is to stray Amid a foreign land, thyself unknown, And when o'erwearied with the toilsome day To rest at eve and feel thyself alone.
Page 36 - ... space of nearly 420 feet of excavated rock ; being, upon the average, about 13 feet 2 inches broad all round, and in height 14 feet and a half; while, positively, above these again are excavated fine large rooms. Within the court, and opposite these galleries, or virandas, stands Keylas the Proud, wonderfully towering in hoary majesty a mighty fabric of rock, surpassed by no relic of antiquity in the known world.
Page 36 - ... 145 feet, by 62 broad having well-formed doorways, windows, staircases to its upper floor, containing fine large rooms of a smooth and polished surface, regularly divided by...

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