Public-private Policy Partnerships

Front Cover
MIT Press, 2000 - Business & Economics - 256 pages
2 Reviews

Partnerships between the public and private sectors to fulfill public functions are on the increase at every level of government. In the United States and Canada they currently operate in most policy areas, and in the U.S. trial programs are planned by the Internal Revenue Service, the Census Bureau, and the Social Security Administration.Partnerships represent the second generation of efforts to bring competitive market discipline to bear on government operations. Unlike the first generation of privatizing efforts, partnering involves sharing both responsibility and financial risk. In the best situations, the strengths of each sector maximize overall performance. In these cases, partnering institutionalizes collaborative arrangements in which the differences between the sectors become blurred.This is the first book to evaluate public-private partnerships in a broad range of policy areas. The chapters focus on education, health care and health policy, welfare, prisons, the criminal justice system, environmental policy, energy policy, technology research and development, and transportation. The contributors come from a number of fields, including political science, education, law, economics, and public health. They merge experiential and social-scientific findings to examine how partnerships perform, to identify the conditions in which they work best, and to determine when they might be expected to fail.Contributors : Ronald J. Daniels, James A. Dunn, Jr., Sheldon Kamieniecki, Harry M. Levin, Stephen H. Linder, Nicholas P. Lovrich, Jr., Mark Carl Rom, Pauline Vaillancourt Rosenau, Walter A. Rosenbaum, Anne Larason Schneider, David Shafie, Julie Silvers, Michael S. Sparer, Joseph E. Stiglitz, Michael J. Trebilcock, Scott J. Wallsten.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

第三页,between 76-87相信政府应该提供公共卫生

Contents

Mapping the Terrain of the PublicPrivate Policy Partnership
1
Coming to Terms With the PublicPrivate Partnership
19
PublicPrivate Technology Partnerships
37
The Good Lessons of Bad Experience
59
Transportation
77
An Organizational Analysis of the PublicPrivate Partnership
93
Forming Partnerships in Environmental Policy
111
The PublicPrivate Nexus in Education
129
Myths and Misunderstandings
143
From Welfare State to Opportunity
161
Policy Partnering Between the Public and the NotforProfit
183
PublicPrivate Partnerships in the U S Prison System
199
The Strengths and Weaknesses of PublicPrivate Policy
217
About the Contributors
243
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2000)

Vaillancourt is Associate Professor of Management and Policy Sciences in the School of Public Health, Health Science Center at Houston, University of Texas.

Bibliographic information