An authentic account of the Shaksperian manuscripts, &c (Google eBook)

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Printed for J. Debrett, 1796 - Literary forgeries and mystifications - 43 pages
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Page 42 - I am myself both the author and writer, and have had no aid or assistance from any soul living, and that I should never have gone so far, but that the world praised the papers so much, and thereby flattered my vanity... Thirdly, That any publication which may appear, tending to prove the manuscripts genuine, or contradict what is here stated, is false ; this being the true account.
Page 16 - Mr. Ireland, we have many fine things in our Church-service, and our Litany abounds with beauties, but here is a man has distanced us all." For a long time Ireland made almost daily additions to his pretended discoveries. Was it possible that his father had no suspicion of their origin, and was he entirely deceived by the monstrous assertions of his clever, but unprincipled son ? The appearance of the...
Page 42 - Secondly, That I am myself both the author and writer, and have had no aid or assistance from any soul living, and that I should never have gone so far, but that the world praised the papers so much, and thereby flattered my vanity...
Page 34 - Reading, from many gentlemen there j "tfho all agree that my state is truly a pitiable one ; and all seem to dread the event. I know not the nature of your oaths and engagements, nor does the world ; but it is universally allowed, that no obligation should lead a parent into ruin. " If the papers are to be established as genuine...
Page 3 - I determined on trying an experiment with it, and for the purpose wrote a letter, in imitation of the hand of that period, as from the author of the book, making it the presentation copy from himself to the Queen. I wrote this Epistle with common ink, weakened with water, but found its appearanee too modern : notwithstanding I determined on shewing it to my father, who thought it genuine. This and the Book I exchanged with him for some
Page 43 - Here then I conclude, most sincerely regretting any offence I may have given the world, or any particular individual, trusting at the same time, they will deem the whole the act of a boy, without any evil or bad intention, but hurried on thoughtless of any danger that awaited to ensnare him.
Page 43 - ... on, thoughtless of any danger that awaited to ensnare him. Should I attempt another play, or any other stage performance, I shall hope the public will lay aside all prejudice my conduct may have deserved, and grant me that kind indulgence which is the certain inmate of every Englishman's bosom.
Page 19 - Shakspear, on the contrary, the world thought him a much more pure and even writer than before.
Page 3 - Shakspear's, it might occasion a little mirth, and shew how far credulity would go in the search for antiquities. Having one day purchased a thin quarto tract of the time of Elizabeth, illuminated and bound in vellum, with her arms on the cover, I determined on trying an experiment with it, and for the purpose wrote a letter (in imitation of the hand of that period) as from the author of the book, making it the presentation copy from himself to the queen. I wrote this...
Page 42 - Before I conclude, I shall sum up this account, and am willing to make affidavit to the following declarations, as well as to the whole of this narration. First, I solemnly declare that my father was perfectly unacquainted with the whole affair, believing the papers most firmly the productions of Shakspeare.

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