Poverty and Poor Law Reform in Britain: From Chadwick to Booth, 1834-1914

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Longman, 1998 - History - 142 pages
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The Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834 is one of the most important pieces of social legislation ever enacted. Its principles and the workhouse system dominated attitudes to welfare provision for the next 80 years. This new Seminar Study explores the changing ideas to poverty over this period and assesses current debates on Victorian attitudes to the poor. David Englander reviews the old system of poor relief; he considers how the New Poor Law was enacted and received and looks at how it worked in practice. The chapter on the Scottish experience will be particularly welcomed, as will Dr Englander's discussion of the place of the Poor Law within British history.





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Contents

INSIDE THE WORKHOUSE
31
THE POOR LAW IN SCOTLAND
47
SOCIAL INQUIRY AND POOR LAW REFORM
56
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About the author (1998)

David Englander is Lecturer in European Humanities Studies.

Diana Norman is Lecturer in Art History.

Rosemary O'Day is Senior Lecturer in History.

W. R. Owens is Staff Tutor in Literature.

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