Alternative Energy For Dummies

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Wiley, Apr 22, 2009 - Science - 384 pages
1 Review

Get the truth about alternative energy and make it part of your life

Want to utilize cleaner, greener types of energy? This plain-English guide clearly explains the popular forms of alternative energy that you can use in your home, your car, and more. Separating myth from fact, this resource explores the current fossil fuel conundrum, the benefits of alternatives, and the energy of the future, such as hydrogen and fuel cell technology.

  • The ABCs of alternative energy — what it is, how it works, and what the real costs are
  • Where we are now — learn where our current energy comes from and how much longer it will last

  • Take the first step — see how energy efficiency and conservation can reduce your reliance on fossil fuels

  • Grasp the alternatives — from nuclear power to geothermal energy to wood burning, understand the benefits that alternative energy can have on the nation

  • Apply alternative fuels to transportation — from biofuels to exotic propulsion to electricity, see how they are best used and how hybrid, all-electric, and fuel cell–powered vehicles work

  • Get a peek into the future — see what the outlook holds for each form of alternative energy discussed

Open the book and find:

  • The pros and cons of alternative energy
  • A review of the current world energy economy

  • The problems with fossil fuels, from smog to global warming

  • Advantages of alternative energy

  • Practical results of alternatives you can use in daily life

  • Guidelines for investing in alternative energy vehicles

  • Ten ways you can bring about change right now

  • Insight into the future of energy production — and how you can invest in it

What people are saying - Write a review

alternative energy for dummies

User Review  - colinmberry - Overstock.com

The book goes into great detail of existing energy policy and useage. I have not gotten to the part of solar electricity which is why I bought the book but I suspect it will give me more insight to the process. I intend to use this info to solar power my house and then build an electric car. Read full review

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About the author (2009)

Rik DeGunther attended the University of Illinois as an undergraduate and Stanford University as a graduate student, studying both applied physics and engineering economics (some of this education actually stuck). He holds several United States patents and has designed a wide range of technical equipment including solar energy platforms, military-grade radar jammers, weather-measurement equipment, high-powered radar vacuum tubes, computerized production hardware, golf practice devices, digital and analog electronic circuits, unmanned aerial vehicles, guitars and amplifi ers, microwave fi lters and mixers, automatic cabinet openers, strobe light communications systems, explosive devices (strictly on accident), cloud-height sensors, fog sensors, furniture, houses, barns, rocket ships, dart throwers, fl ame throwers, eavesdropping devices, escape routes, and you name it. He’s one of those nerdy guys who likes to take things apart to see how they work and then put them back together and try to fi gure out what the leftover parts are for.
Rik is CEO of Effi cient Homes, an energy-effi ciency auditing fi rm in Northern California. He is actively engaged in designing and developing new solar equipment, including off-grid lighting systems and off-grid swimming pool heaters. He writes weekly op-ed columns for the Mountain Democrat, California’s oldest and most venerable newspaper. He has also written a highly acclaimed golf book (on putting) and spends most of his free time attempting to improve his relatively impressive but objectively droll golf handicap, usually to no avail. Sometimes the urge strikes him to play a very loud guitar, of which he owns a collection with far more intrinsic quality than the playing they receive. His hearing has been faltering the last few years, so he rebuilt his amplifi er to go up to 11.

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