Modern Japanese Aesthetics: A Reader (Google eBook)

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University of Hawaii Press, 1999 - Literary Criticism - 322 pages
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This work concerns the history of the Japanese philosophy of art, from its inception in the 1870s to the present. In addition to the historical information and discussion of aesthetic issues that appear in the introductions to each of the chapters, the book presents English translations of otherwise inaccessible major works on Japanese aesthetics, beginning with a complete and annotated translation of the first work in the field, Nishi Amane's Bimygaku Setsu (The Theory of Aesthetics). Modern Japanese Aesthetics discusses the momentous efforts made by Japanese thinkers to master, assimilate, and transform Western philosophical systems to discuss their own literary and artistic heritage. Readers are introduced to debates between the unconditional supporters of Western ideas and more cautious approaches to the literary and artistic past. The institutionalization of aesthetics as an academic subject is discussed and the work of some of Japan's most distinguished professional aestheticians and literary critics is included.
  

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Contents

IV
17
V
26
VI
38
VII
48
VIII
65
IX
71
X
79
XI
83
XX
171
XXI
179
XXII
218
XXIII
220
XXIV
229
XXV
231
XXVI
242
XXVII
251

XII
93
XIII
98
XIV
113
XV
115
XVI
122
XVII
141
XVIII
148
XIX
169
XXVIII
263
XXIX
270
XXX
301
XXXI
305
XXXII
311
XXXIII
319
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Page 28 - Ame-no-uzume-no-mikoto bound up her sleeves with a cord of heavenly hi-kage vine, tied around her head a head-band of the heavenly ma-saki vine, bound together bundles of sasa leaves to hold in her hands, and overturning a bucket before the heavenly rock-cave door, stamped resoundingly upon it. Then she became divinely possessed, exposed her breasts, and pushed her skirt-band down to her genitals.

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About the author (1999)

Marra is associate professor of Japanese literature at the University of California at Los Angeles.

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