The Facts Stated: Hon. Thurlow Weed on the Morgan Abduction. A Document for the People (Google eBook)

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National Christian Association, 1882 - 15 pages
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Page 16 - ... anti-Masons styled themselves, opened one of their sessions in Batavia, there was unveiled over the last resting place of Timothy Monroe an imposing monument to the memory of William Morgan. The inscriptions upon the shaft are interesting and read as follows : North side : Sacred to the memory of William Morgan, a native of Virginia, a captain in the war of 1812, a respectable AN OLD MASONIC BUILDING IN WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA citizen of Batavia, and a martyr to the freedom of writing, printing,...
Page 13 - I went to Europe, and while in London, wrote a letter to Whitney, asking him to get Alex. B. Williams, then a resident of Chicago, to do what I had so unpardonably neglected. That letter reached Chicago one week after Whitney's death, closing the last and only chance for the revelation of that important event.
Page 12 - Cummings of Rochester) was called on for a toast. " He responded with peculiar emphasis and in the language of their ritual, ' The enemies of our Order, may they find a grave six feet deep, six feet long, and six feet due east and west.' " Immediately after that toast, which was received with great enthusiasm, Col. William King, an officer in our war of 1812, and then a member of the assembly from Niagara County, called Whitney of Rochester, Howard of Buffalo, Chubbuck of Lewiston, and Garside of...
Page 12 - King, an officer in our war of 1812, and then a member of the assembly from Niagara County, called Whitney of Rochester, Howard of Buffalo, Chubbuck of Lewiston, and Garside of Canada, out of the room, and into a carriage furnished by Major Barton. They were driven to Fort Niagara, repaired to the magazine, and informed Morgan that the arrangements for sending him to Canada were completed, and that his family would soon follow him. " Morgan received the information cheerfully, and walked with supposed...
Page 16 - West side : The bane of our civil institutions is to be found in Masonry, already powerful, and daily becoming more so ... I owe to my country an exposure of its dangers.
Page 12 - Canada were comj.'^ted and that his family would soon follow him. Morgan received the information cheerfully and walked with supposed friends to the boat, which was rowed to the mouth of the river, where a rope was wound around his body, to each end of which a sinker was attached. Morgan was then thrown overboard. He grasped the gunwale of the boat convulsively. Garside, in forcing Morgan to relinquish his hold was severely bitten.
Page 1 - ... officer, I wrote a six-line paragraph for the Rochester Telegraph, in which I stated that a citizen of Batavia had been spirited away from his home and family, and that, after a mysterious absence of several days, a village meeting had been held and a committee of citizens appointed to investigate the matter; adding, that as it was known that Freemasons were concerned in this abduction, it behooved the fraternity, whose good name was suffering, to take the laboring oar in restoring the lost man...
Page 6 - Our committee took no part in the third inquest, and the body, as is known, was declared to be that of Timothy Monroe. Simultaneously an incident occurred showing the vindictive spirit of our opponents. On the evening of the day that the body interred at Batavia was declared by a third inquest to be that of Timothy Monroe, I went into the billiard room of the Eagle Hotel to see a friend from Clarkson. When leaving the room Ebenezer Griffin, Esq., a prominent lawyer, employed as counsel for Masons,...
Page 11 - Col. Jewett turned to Whitney with emphasis and said: "John, what if you make a clean breast of it?" Whitney looked inquiringly at Barton, who added: "Go ahead." Whitney then related in detail the history of Morgan's abduction and fate. The idea of suppressing Morgan's intended exposure of the secrets of Masonry was first suggested by a man by the name of Johns. It was discussed in Lodges at Batavia, Le Roy and Rochester. Johns suggested that Morgan should be separated from Miller and placed on a...
Page 10 - ... was on the stand." Gen. Mathews was the leading counsel for the kidnappers, but refused to be a party in tampering with witnesses. On our return to Rochester, the witness Adams was in an extra stage with his Masonic friends. As there was no longer any need of hiding, he was on his way to Niagara. In passing the Mansion House, Rochester, Adams, who was standing in the doorway, asked me to stop, saying he wanted to explain his testimony. The lawyers, he said, informed him that if he told what he...

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