The Student's Blackstone: Being the Commentaries on the Laws of England of Sir William Blackstone, Knt., Abridged and Adapted to the Present State of the Law (Google eBook)

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William Clowes and Sons, 1885 - Law - 596 pages
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Page 49 - Will you to the utmost of your power maintain the laws of God, the true profession of the gospel, and the protestant reformed religion established by law ? And will you preserve unto the bishops and clergy of this realm, and to the churches committed to their charge, all such rights and privileges as by law do or shall appertain unto them, or any of them? King or queen. All this I promise to do.
Page 49 - And whereas the laws of England are the birthright of the people thereof, and all the kings and queens who shall ascend the throne of this realm ought to administer the government of the same according to the said laws, and all their officers and ministers ought to serve them respectively according to the same...
Page 50 - The things which I have here before promised I will perform and keep : so help me God :" and then shall kiss the book (12).
Page 169 - That no claim which may be lawfully made at the common law, by custom, prescription, or grant, to any way or other easement, or to any watercourse, or the use of any water...
Page 158 - The first rule is, that inheritances shall lineally descend to the issue of the person who last died actually seised in infinitum: but shall never lineally ascend.
Page 363 - In case no appearance shall be entered in an action for the recovery of land, within the time limited for appearance, or if an appearance be entered, but the defence be limited to part only, the plaintiff shall be at liberty to enter a judgment that the person whose title is asserted in the writ shall recover possession of the land, or of the part thereof to which the defence does not apply.
Page 450 - LASTLY, extortion is an abuse of public justice, which consists in any officer's unlawfully taking, by colour of his office, from any man, any money or thing of value, that is not due to him, or more than is due, or before it is due ". The punishment is fine and imprisonment, and sometimes a forfeiture of the office.
Page 410 - That such jurisdiction shall only be exercised where it is proved to the satisfaction of the court that the person making default either has or has had since the date of the order or judgment the means to pay the sum in respect of which he has made default, and has refused or neglected, or refuses or neglects, to pay the same.
Page 4 - Municipal law, thus understood, is properly defined to be a 'rule of civil conduct prescribed by the supreme power in a state, commanding what is right and prohibiting what is wrong.
Page 518 - Now the general principle on which this species of evidence is admitted is that they are declarations made in extremity, when the party is at the point of death, and when every hope of this world is gone; when every motive to falsehood is silenced, and the mind is induced by the most powerful considerations to speak the truth ; a situation so solemn and so awful is considered by the law as creating an obligation equal to that which is imposed by a positive oath administered in a court of justice.

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