Reuben Sachs (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Broadview Press, Mar 28, 2006 - Fiction - 251 pages
3 Reviews
Oscar Wilde wrote of this novel, “Its directness, its uncompromising truths, its depth of feeling, and above all, its absence of any single superfluous word, make Reuben Sachs, in some sort, a classic.” Reuben Sachs, the story of an extended Anglo-Jewish family in London, focuses on the relationship between two cousins, Reuben Sachs and Judith Quixano, and the tensions between their Jewish identities and English society. The novel’s complex and sometimes satirical portrait of Anglo-Jewish life, which was in part a reaction to George Eliot’s romanticized view of Victorian Jews in Daniel Deronda, caused controversy on its first publication. This Broadview edition prints for the first time since its initial publication in The Jewish Chronicle Levy's essay "The Jew in Fiction." Other appendices include George Eliot's essay on anti-Jewish sentiment in Victorian England and a chapter from Israel Zangwill's novel The Children of the Ghetto. Also included is a map of Levy's London with landmarks from her biography and from the "Jewish geography" of Reuben Sachs.
  

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Review: Reuben Sachs

User Review  - StrangeBedfellows - Goodreads

This is the sort of book that I would never have picked up had I not been required to read it for class. It's dry, tedious, uneventful . . . really not a pleasure to read. There's a cleverness to Levy ... Read full review

Review: Reuben Sachs

User Review  - Tara - Goodreads

Leaves you wondering what more Amy Levy might have achieved had she not committed suicide in 1889, in her late 20s. After reading this novel, Oscar Wilde described Levy as 'a girl of genius', and in ... Read full review

Contents

Acknowledgements
9
A Brief Chronology
45
Contemporary Reviews of Reuben Sachs
159
7 February 1879 28 February 1879 171
173
Poetry
188
From Israel Zangwill Children of the Ghetto 1892
202
Copyright

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Page 13 - It is a peculiar sensation, this double-consciousness, this sense of always looking at one's self through the eyes of others, of measuring one's soul by the tape of a world that looks on in amused contempt and pity.

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About the author (2006)

Susan David Bernstein is a Professor of English, Jewish Studies, and Women’s Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is the author of Confessional Subjects: Revelations of Gender and Power in Victorian Literature and Culture (University of North Carolina Press, 1997).

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