The Kitchen God's Wife (Google eBook)

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Penguin, Sep 21, 2006 - Fiction - 416 pages
3 Reviews
With the same narrative skills and evocative powers that made her first novel, The Joy Luck Club, a national bestseller, Tan now tells the story of Winnie Louie, an aging Chinese woman unfolding a life's worth of secrets to her suspicious, Americanized daughter.
  

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Perfect Timing- I read this book during my daily route for running errands. One done, I past it along to a stranger that getting her GED, and wanted to write on women's issues. With her stood her daughter who was interested in the title and premise. I gave the book such high accolades that they were sold. 

Review: The Kitchen God's Wife

User Review  - Sarah - Goodreads

Why do I love these books? They are all about women who try to think and feel at the same time. They are taught to be submissive and understand the feelings of others to the extreme. Imagine how hard ... Read full review

Contents

ITHE SHOPOF THEGODS Chapter 2GRAND AUNTIE DUS FUNERAL Chapter 3WHEN FISH ARETHREE DAYS
Chapter 4 LONGLONG DISTANCE
Chapter 5 TEN THOUSAND THINGS
Chapter 6PEANUTS FORTUNE
Chapter 7DOWRY COUNTING
Chapter 8TOO MUCH
Chapter 9BEST TIME OF YEAR
Chapter 10LOYANG LUCK
HEAVENS BREATH
BAD
A FLEA ON A TIGERS HEAD
THEGREAT WORLD Chapter 17 THE FOUR GATES Chapter 18 AMERICAN DANCE
Chapter 19WEAKAND STRONG Chapter 20FOUR DAUGHTERS ON THE TABLE
Chapter 21LITTLE YUSMOTHER Chapter 22ONE SEASON LEFT Chapter 23 SINCERELY YOURS TRULY
FAVOR Chapter 25
Chapter 26

Chapter 11FOUR SPLITS FIVE CRACKS
Chapter 12TAONAN MONEY

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About the author (2006)

Amy Tan is the author of The Joy Luck Club, The Kitchen Godís Wife, The Hundred Secret Senses, The Bonesetter's Daughter, The Opposite of Fate, Saving Fish from Drowning, and two childrenís books, The Moon Lady and The Chinese Siamese Cat, which has been adapted as Sagwa, a PBS series for children. Tan was also the co-producer and co-screenwriter of the film version of The Joy Luck Club, and her essays and stories have appeared in numerous magazines and anthologies. Her work has been translated into more than twenty-five languages. Tan, who has a masterís degree in linguistics from San Jose University, has worked as a language specialist to programs serving children with developmental disabilities. She lives with her husband in San Francisco and New York.

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