The Americans

Front Cover
Scalo, 1959 - Photography - 179 pages
15 Reviews
Previously published in 1959, Frank's most famous and influential photography book contained a series of deceptively simple photos that he took on a trip through America in 1955 and 1956. These pictures of everyday people still speak to us today, 40 years and several generations later.

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A seminal book in American photography. - Goodreads
Interesting book of American photographs from the '50s. - Goodreads
Probably my favorite collection of photographs ever. - Goodreads
Kerouac wrote the introduction. - Goodreads

Review: The Americans

User Review  - Jim - Goodreads

An amazing collection of mid-1950s black-and-white photographs taken by Frank during a cross-country ramble through America that shows in stark detail people and places of the era. Each photo is like ... Read full review

Review: The Americans

User Review  - Brian Cronin - Goodreads

This book, and Walker Evans' 'American Photographs' helped define who I became as a person. Getting on the road, photographing, and exploring this vast country of ours. Finding that balance between ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Copyright

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About the author (1959)

Robert Frank, Ph.D., is an educational psychologist, family therapist, and assistant professor of psychology at Oakton Community College in Des Plaines, Illinois. His dyslexia was undiagnosed until graduate school. He is married and the father of two children.

Jack Kerouac's (1922-1969) "On the Road" was published in 1957, six years after its completion. It went on to become a bestseller and is considered the quintessential statement of the 1950's literary movement known as the Beat Generation. Born in Lowell, Massachusetts, Kerouac did stints at Columbia University, in the Navy and in the Merchant Marine before meeting Allen Ginsberg, William Burroughs and Neal Cassady, who would influence the rest of his life and his writing. Kerouac died in St. Petersburg, Florida at the age of forty-seven.

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