Neurolinguistics: An Introduction to Spoken Language Processing and its Disorders (Google eBook)

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 18, 2007 - Language Arts & Disciplines
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What biological factors make human communication possible? How do we process and understand language? How does brain damage affect these mechanisms, and what can this tell us about how language is organized in the brain? The field of neurolinguistics seeks to answer these questions, which are crucial to linguistics, psychology and speech pathology alike. This textbook, first published in 2007, introduces the central topics in neurolinguistics: speech recognition, word and sentence structure, meaning, and discourse - in both 'normal' speakers and those with language disorders. It moves on to provide a balanced discussion of key areas of debate such as modularity and the 'language areas' of the brain, 'connectionist' versus 'symbolic' modelling of language processing, and the nature of linguistic and mental representations. Making accessible over half a century of scientific and linguistic research, and containing extensive study questions, it will be welcomed by all those interested in the relationship between language and the brain.
  

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Contents

Introduction and overview
3
Aspects of linguistic competence
15
The neuroanatomy of language
40
4Onmodularity and method
66
The problem of speech recognition
93
paradigms and findings
112
The speech recognition lexicon
140
Disorders of auditory processing
155
Sentence comprehension and syntactic parsing
243
Online processing working memory and modularity
266
Agrammatism revisited
297
Discourse processing
331
Breakdown of discourse
346
Conclusion and prospectus
367
Glossary
380
References
387

Morphology and the mental lexicon
179
Summary
196
Lexical semantic disorders in aphasia
221

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 397 - A. Shift of ear superiority in dichotic listening to temporally patterned nonverbal stimuli. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 1973, 53, 46-50.

About the author (2007)

John C. L. Ingram is Senior Lecturer on the Linguistics Program at the University of Queensland.

Bibliographic information