The Waverley Anecdotes,: Illustrative of the Incidents, Characters, and Scenery, Described in the Novels and Romances of Sir Walter Scott, Bart, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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J. Cochrane and J. McCrone, 1833
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Page 418 - He hath destroyed me on every side, and I am gone: and mine hope hath he removed like a tree.
Page 323 - This whole fabric hung, as it were, by a large tree, which reclined from the one end all along the roof to the other, and which gave it the name of the Cage, and by chance there happened to be two stones at a small distance from one another, in the side next the precipice, resembling the pillars of a chimney, where the fire was VOL.
Page 442 - Love wont to gae ! 1 leant my back unto an aik, I thought it was a trusty tree ; But first it bow'd, and syne it brak, Sae my true Love did lichtly me. O waly waly, but love be bonny A little time while it is new ; But when 'tis auld, it waxeth cauld And fades awa
Page 456 - I wished to make him the happy instrument of alleviating the horrors of hopeless captivity, when the brave are overpowered and made prisoners of war. It was, perhaps, fortunate for you, Madam, that he was from home; for it was my intention to have taken him on board the Ranger, and to have detained him until, through his means, a general and fair exchange of prisoners, as well in Europe as in America, had been effected.
Page 322 - ... levelled with earth and gravel. There were betwixt the trees, growing naturally on their own roots, some stakes fixed in the earth, which, with the trees, were interwoven with ropes, made of heath and birch twigs...
Page 322 - situated in the face of a very rough, high and rocky mountain called Letternilichk, still a part of Benalder, full of great stones and crevices, and some scattered wood interspersed. The habitation, called the Cage, in the face of that mountain, was within a small thick bush of wood.
Page 458 - Heaven can never countenance the barbarous and unmanly practice of the Britons in America, which savages would blush at, and which, if not discontinued, will soon be retaliated on Britain by a justly enraged people. Should you fail in this (for I am persuaded that you will attempt it, and who can resist the power of such an advocate...
Page 457 - Ranger, and to have detained him until, through his means, a general and fair exchange of prisoners, as well in Europe as in America, had been effected. When I was informed, by some men whom I met at landing, that his lordship was absent, I walked back to my boat, determined to leave the island.
Page 458 - I profess myself a citizen of the world, totally unfettered by the little, mean distinctions of climate or of country, which diminish the benevolence of the heart and set bounds to philanthropy. Before this war was begun, I had, at an early time of life, withdrawn from sea service, in favor of calm contemplation and poetic ease.
Page 161 - I have heard her say, she could never look back upon their manner of living there without thinking it a miracle; they had no want, but plenty of...

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