Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg

Front Cover
ReadHowYouWant.com, Jan 1, 2006 - Fiction - 116 pages
15 Reviews
Mark Twain's classic tale is a funny yet blistering indictment of political hypocrisy. A mysterious stranger is treated badly by the town of Hadleyburg-the town that proclaims itself "the most honest and upright town in the region." Through an ingenious sting operation, the stranger sets out to expose Hadleyburg's leading citizens and reveal their greedy, deceitful natures. Twain's burning wit and insight into political posturing and civic cowardice seem more pertinent than ever.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
6
4 stars
5
3 stars
3
2 stars
0
1 star
1

Review: The Man Who Corrupted Hadleyburg

User Review  - Topherjaynes - Goodreads

“Why, you simple creatures, the weakest of all weak things is a virtue which has not been tested in the fire. ” Read full review

Review: The Man Who Corrupted Hadleyburg

User Review  - Steven - Goodreads

Nothing can be called fire-proof, water-proof, and idiot-proof until it has been tested by fire, water, and idiots. Hadleyburg cannot be called incorruptible until it has been appropriately tested. It ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Chapter I
1
Chapter II
28
Chapter III
49
Chapter IV
92
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2006)

Mark Twain was born Samuel L. Clemens in Florida, Missouri on November 30, 1835. He worked as a printer for a time, and then became a steamboat pilot. He traveled in the West, writing humorous sketches for newspapers. In 1865, he wrote the short story, The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County, which was very well received. He then began a career as a humorous travel writer and lecturer, publishing The Innocents Abroad in 1869, Roughing It in 1872, and, co-authored with Charles Dudley Warner, Gilded Age in 1873. His best-known works are The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876), Mississippi Writing: Life on the Mississippi (1883), and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884). He died of a heart attack on April 21, 1910.

Bibliographic information