The Travels of Bertrandon de La Brocq́uière to Palestine: And His Return from Jersulem Overland to France, During the Years 1432 & 1433 : Extracted and Put Into Modern French from a Manuscript in the National Library at Paris and Published (Google eBook)

Front Cover
At the Hafod Press, by J. Henderson, 1807 - Palestine - 336 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Related books

Contents

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 237 - Dymodiquef, a good town, inclosed with a double wall. It is defended on one side by a river, and on the other by a large and strong castle, constructed on an elevation which is almost round, and which may contain within its extent three hundred houses. In the castle is a dungeon, wherein I was told the Turk keeps his treasure. From. Demetica we came to YpsalaJ; it has been a tolerable town, but is totally destroyed. I crossed the Mariza a second time. * Perhaps Larissa -(Seres), in Phrygia. -(- Demetica?...
Page 114 - The people of Damascus are persuaded that, had he lived, Tamerlane would never have carried his arms thither. Tamerlane, however, did honour to his memory; for when he took the town, and ordered it to be set on fire, he commanded the house of Berkot to be spared, and appointed a guard to prevent its being hurt by the fire, so that it subsists to this day. The Christians are hated at Damascus. Every evening the merchants are shut up in their houses by persons appointed for this purpose, who, on the...
Page 130 - ... they had all entered the town. This event was, according to custom, a great festival. The governor of Damascus, attended by the principal persons of the town, went to meet the caravan out of respect to the Alcoran, which it bore. This is the book of law which Mohammed left to his followers. It was enveloped in a silken covering, painted over with Moorish inscriptions; and the camel that bore it was, in like manner, decorated all over with silk. Four musicians, and a great number of drums and...
Page 139 - They are not turned up, and have but four nail holes, two on each side. The nails are square, with a thick and heavy head. When a shoe is wanted, and it is necessary to work it to make it fit the hoof, it is done cold, without ever putting it in the fire, which can readily be done because it is so thin. To pare the hoof they use a pruning knife, similar to what vinedressers trim their vines with, both on this as well as on the other side of the sea.
Page 217 - Amurath, to negotiate a peace between these two princes. Sir Benedicto, in honour of my lord of Burgundy, gave me a gracious reception. He even told me, that to do mischief to the Venetians, he had contributed to make them lose Salonica, taken from them by the Turks...
Page 224 - Trebisonde, seemed very handsome, but as I was at a distance I wished to have a nearer view ; and I was also desirous to see how she mounted her horse, for it was thus she had come to the church, attended only by two ladies, three old men, ministers of state, and three of that species of men to whose guard the Turks intrust their wives. On coming out of St. Sophia...
Page 112 - I own that my first movement was to lift my fist at him, but the moucre, throwing himself between us, pushed me aside, and very fortunately for me he did so ; for in an instant we were surrounded by thirty or forty persons, and if I had given a blow I know not what would have become of us. I mention this circumstance to show that the inhabitants of Damascus are a wicked race, and consequently care should be taken to avoid any quarrels with them. It is the same in other Mohammedan countries. I know...
Page 292 - In their ordinary marches they only walk, but in these they always gallop ; and as they are beside lightly armed, they will thus advance further, from evening to day-break, than in three other days ; and this is the reason why they cannot wear such complete armour as the French and Italians. They choose, also, no horses but such as walk fast, and gallop for a long time, while we select only those that gallop well and with ease.
Page 246 - Gallipoli three aspers for each man, and five for each horse. It is the same at the passage of the Danube. Whenever his soldiers go on an expedition, and make a capture of slaves, he has the right of choosing one out of every five. He is, nevertheless, thought not to love war, and this report seems to me well founded.
Page 116 - Sanson an4 myself returned to Baruth, where we found sir Andrew, Pierre de Vaudrei, Geoffroi de Toisi and Jean de la Roe, who had come thither, as Jacques Coeur had told us. The galley arrived from Alexandria two or three days afterward; but, during this short interval, we witnessed a feast, celebrated by the Moors in their ancient manner. It began in the evening at sun-set. Numerous companies, scattered here and there, were singing and uttering loud cries. While this was passing, the cannon of the...

Bibliographic information