The Innocents Abroad (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, Apr 3, 2007 - Fiction - 560 pages
9 Reviews
One of the most famous travel books ever written by an American, The Innocents Abroad is Mark Twain’s irreverent and incisive commentary on nineteenth century Americans encountering the Old World. Come along for the ride as Twain and his unsuspecting travel companions visit the Azores, Tangiers, Paris, Rome, the Vatican, Genoa, Gibraltar, Odessa, Constantinople, Cairo, the Holy Land and other locales renowned in history. No person or place is safe from Twain’s sharp wit as it impales both the conservative and the liberal, the Old World and the New. He uses these contrasts to “find out who we as Americans are,” notes Leslie A. Fiedler. But his travelogue demonstrates that, in our attempt to understand ourselves, we must first find out what we are not.

With an Introduction Michael Meyer and an Afterword by Leslie A. Fiedler
  

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Review: The Innocents Abroad

User Review  - Jennifer - Goodreads

I really wanted to like this. But it felt like I was reading a textbook. Very boring. Only got through 120 pages or so until I remembered I should enjoy what I'm reading, so I'm throwing in the towel. Read full review

Review: The Innocents Abroad

User Review  - Shannon K - Goodreads

As always, Twain entertains with wonderfully witty humor and poignant satire. I really enjoyed the way he created a cast of characters out of his fellow passengers without giving them too much ... Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
xix
PREFACE
3
CHAPTER 1
5
CHAPTER 2
13
CHAPTER 3
17
CHAPTER 4
20
CHAPTER 5
27
CHAPTER 6
33
CHAPTER 31
245
CHAPTER 32
253
CHAPTER 33
266
CHAPTER 34
276
CHAPTER 35
287
CHAPTER 36
292
CHAPTER 37
295
CHAPTER 38
305

CHAPTER 7
39
CHAPTER 8
50
CHAPTER 9
55
CHAPTER 10
61
CHAPTER 11
67
CHAPTER 12
72
CHAPTER 13
82
CHAPTER 14
91
CHAPTER 15
98
CHAPTER 16
109
CHAPTER 17
113
CHAPTER 18
122
CHAPTER 19
130
CHAPTER 20
143
CHAPTER 21
149
CHAPTER 22
156
CHAPTER 23
166
CHAPTER 24
178
CHAPTER 25
186
CHAPTER 26
195
CHAPTER 27
212
CHAPTER 28
223
CHAPTER 29
231
CHAPTER 30
237
CHAPTER 39
313
CHAPTER 40
317
CHAPTER 41
326
CHAPTER 42
332
CHAPTER 43
338
CHAPTER 44
344
CHAPTER 45
354
CHAPTER 46
365
CHAPTER 47
373
CHAPTER 48
385
CHAPTER 49
395
CHAPTER 50
404
CHAPTER 51
413
CHAPTER 52
426
CHAPTER 53
431
CHAPTER 54
445
CHAPTER 55
455
CHAPTER 56
470
CHAPTER 57
475
CHAPTER 58
482
CHAPTER 59
496
CHAPTER 60
499
CHAPTER 61
502
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

In his person and in his pursuits, Mark Twain (1835-1910) was a man of extraordinary contrasts. Although he left school at twelve, when his father died, he was eventually awarded honorary degrees from Yale University, the University of Missouri, and Oxford University. His career encompassed such varied occupations as printer, Mississippi riverboat pilot, journalist, travel writer, and publisher. He made fortunes from his writing, but toward the end of his life he had to resort to lecture tours to pay his debts. He was hot-tempered, profane, and sentimental—and also pessimistic, cynical, and tortured by self-doubt. His nostalgia for the past helped produce some of his best books. He lives in American letters as a great artist, the writer whom William Dean Howells called “the Lincoln of our literature.”

Michael Meyer, Ph.D., professor emeritus of English at the University of Connecticut, is a former president of the Thoreau Society and the coauthor of The New Thoreau Handbook, a standard reference. His first book, Several More Lives to Live: Thoreau’s Political Reputation in America, was awarded the Ralph henry Gabriel Prize by the American Studies Association. In addition to The Bedford Introduction to Literature, his edited volumes include Frederick Douglas: The Narrative and Selected Writings.

Leslie A. Fielder (1917-2003) was a longtime professor of English at Montana State University and then the Samuel Langhorne Clemens Professor of Literature at the State University of New York at Buffalo. He was the author of four novels, as well as many influential works of criticism including Life and Death in the American Novel and What Was Literature? Class Culture and Mass Society. Among his many awards is the Modern Language Association’s Hubbell Medal for lifetime contribution to the study of American literature.

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