Dance of Days: Two Decades of Punk in the Nation's Capital

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Akashic Books, 2003 - History - 437 pages
18 Reviews
"A truly compelling narrative . . . a powerful piece of cultural reporting."-Washington Post Washington, D.C.'s creative, politically insurgent punk scene is studied for the first time by local activist Mark Andersen and arts writer Mark Jenkins. The nation's capital gave birth to the most influential punk underground of the '80s and '90s. Dance of Days recounts the rise of trailblazing artists such as Bad Brains, Henry Rollins, Fugazi and Bikini Kill. Mark Andersen is outreach coordinator for Emmaus Services for the Aging, and lives in Washington, D.C. Mark Jenkins writes about music and film for the Washington Post, Washington City Paper, NPR's "All Things Considered," and other outlets. He lives in Washington, D.C.

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Review: Dance of Days: Two Decades of Punk in the Nation's Capital

User Review  - Geoff - Goodreads

A really good article on HR from the city paper, written by Anderson, sad but also really interesting: http://www.washingtoncitypaper.com/ar... Read full review

Review: Dance of Days: Two Decades of Punk in the Nation's Capital

User Review  - Martin Sertich - Goodreads

I was 12/13(around 1983) when I first discovered Minor Threat and started following most of the records DISCHORD was putting out. $3.50 for a full album with an insert and another insert with the ... Read full review

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About the author (2003)

Mark Andersen is outreach coordinator for Emmaus Services for the Aging, a small outreach and advocacy group that assists inner-city seniors in Washington, DC. He remains active with Positive Force DC, Helping Individual Prostitutes Survive, Women?s Advocates to Terminate Sexism (WATTS), as well as with the parish council and justice & service committee of St. Aloysius Catholic Church. He lives in Washington, DC.

Mark Jenkins writes about music, film, and other topics for the Washington Post, Washington City Paper, NPR?s ?All Things Considered,? Time Out New York, and other outlets. He lives in Washington, DC.

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