The Living Age, Volume 295 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Living Age Company, 1917
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Contents


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Page 15 - It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.
Page 677 - Wedding-Guest! this soul hath been Alone on a wide wide sea: So lonely, 'twas, that God himself Scarce seemed there to be.
Page 671 - ANOTHER year ! another deadly blow ! Another mighty Empire overthrown ! And We are left, or shall be left, alone ; The last that dare to struggle with the Foe. 'Tis well ! from this day forward we shall know That in ourselves our safety must be sought ; That by our own right hands it must be wrought ; That we must stand unpropped, or be laid low.
Page 507 - Nor thro' the questions men may try, The petty cobwebs we have spun: If e'er when faith had fall'n' asleep, I heard a voice, "Believe no more," And heard an ever-breaking shore That tumbled in the Godless deep; A warmth within the breast would melt The freezing reason's colder part, And like a man in wrath the heart Stood up and answered, "I have felt.
Page 68 - To such a task we can dedicate our lives and our fortunes, everything that we are and everything that we have, with the pride of those who know that the day has come when America is privileged to spend her blood and her might for the principles that gave her birth and happiness and the peace which she has treasured.
Page 69 - Let me suggest also that every one who creates or cultivates a garden helps and helps greatly to solve the problem of the feeding of the nations and that every housewife who practices strict economy puts herself in the ranks of those who serve the nation. This is the time for America to correct her unpardonable fault of wastefulness and extravagance.
Page 121 - We cannot take the word of the present rulers of Germany as a guarantee of anything that is to endure, unless explicitly supported by such conclusive evidence of the will and purpose of the German people themselves as the other peoples of the world would be justified in accepting.
Page 26 - ... all our reasonings concerning causes and effects, are derived, from nothing but custom; and that belief is more properly an act of the sensitive, than of the cogitative part of 'our natures.
Page 68 - But the right is more precious than peace, and we shall fight for the things which we have always carried nearest our hearts, for democracy, for the right of those who submit to authority to have a voice in their own governments, for the rights and liberties of small nations, for a universal dominion of right by such a concert of free peoples as shall bring peace and safety to all nations and make the world itself at last free.
Page 10 - Oh! it is only a novel!" replies the young lady; while she lays down her book with affected indifference, or momentary shame. - "It is only Cecilia, or Camilla, or Belinda;" or, in short, only some work in which the greatest powers of the mind are displayed, in which the most thorough knowledge of human nature, the happiest delineation of its varieties, the liveliest effusions of wit and humour are conveyed to the world in the best chosen language.

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