History of the Press of Maine (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Joseph Griffin
Press, established A.D. MDCCCXIX [J. Griffin, 1819 - Press - 276 pages
1 Review
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Note that the book is published in 1872 NOT 1819.

Contents

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 189 - With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us strive to finish the work we are in...
Page 176 - ... a view to an ultimate convention of the States, or other practicable means, to the end that peace may be restored on the basis of the federal Union of the States." The two conventions had now presented the great issue to the people. The Baltimore convention that nominated Lincoln had declared for a vigorous prosecution of the war for the maintenance of the Union under the leadership of Lincoln, who had thus far been at the head of the national government. The Chicago convention, giving the sentiments...
Page 34 - Aprtt 4. Our men about this time had a mad day of rejoicing firing cannon incessantly from morning to night, among the houses, and ended in killing Mr. Rollins. 8. We have authentic accounts, many ways, of Peace, though no official one from Congress. 9. Goods at Boston fell in price near half. The Preliminary articles of Peace were certainly signed at Versailles the 20th January, and ratified the 3d of February. An inglorious Peace to Britain, but...
Page 34 - struck off" with his own hands the first sheet ever printed in Maine. About 1798 he left printing, and with no other preparation than that which the grace of God gives, began to preach to the small Baptist society then recently gathered in Portland, the first meetings of which were at Mr.
Page 117 - He subsequently read law, was admitted to the bar, and practiced his profession until his death a few years since.
Page 34 - ... and Williams. The meetings of this society for several years were held at Maquoit, in the meeting-house which was built by the society in the latter part of the last century. In 1829 the meeting-house on Federal Street, which is now occupied by the Catholics, was built ; and in this Elder Titcomb finished his public labors, retiring from the pulpit at the age of eighty-three, after a forty years
Page 79 - Pioneer and Juvenile Key to operate upon the public mind, especially that of the young, by the publication of interesting narratives, setting forth in a clear light, not only the evils of an intemperate use of intoxicating drinks, but the dangers of temperate drinking. The abolition of negro slavery, and of the death penalty for crime, were strongly advocated in the columns of the Piiyneer and Key.
Page 238 - A Survey of the State of Maine, in reference to its Geographical Features, Statistics, and Political Economy ; illustrated by Maps.
Page 75 - During the last two years of its existence it was called the Eastern Galaxy and Herald, the name having been changed in consequence of a larger part of its columns being subsequently devoted to secular interests. In the latter years of this publication the subscribers numbered over eleven hundred, a larger circulation than can be claimed for any other of the many papers subsequently commenced in Brunswick. The Herald was the first paper coinciding fully with the faith and practices of the primitive...
Page 78 - ... subscribers numbered over eleven hundred, a larger circulation than can be claimed for any other of the many papers subsequently commenced in Brunswick. The Herald was the first paper coinciding fully with the faith and practices of the primitive Baptists ever published in the United States. It was also one of the earliest papers in New England to take a stand against the inroads of intemperance, by exposing the causes leading thereto. In 1826 appears in the Herald the first complaint and...

Bibliographic information