Outlines of botany (Google eBook)

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Page 551 - The fig-tree, not that kind for fruit renowned, But such as at this day to Indians known In Malabar or Deccan spreads her arms Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs take root, and daughters grow About the mother tree, a pillared shade High overarched, and echoing walks between...
Page 702 - My lord of Ely, when I was last in Holborn, I saw good strawberries in your garden there ; I do beseech you send for some of them.
Page 998 - The fruitage fair to sight, like that which grew Near that bituminous lake where Sodom flamed ; This, more delusive, not the touch, but taste Deceived ; they, fondly thinking to allay Their appetite with gust, instead of fruit Chewed bitter ashes, which the offended taste With spattering noise rejected.
Page 759 - And one went out into the field to gather herbs, and found a wild vine, and gathered thereof wild gourds his lap full, and came and shred them into the pot of pottage: for they knew them not.
Page 661 - fit dainties for ladies, they came so far, and cost so dear.
Page 990 - A custome lothsome to the eye, hateful to the nose, harmefull to the braine, dangerous to the lungs, and in the blacke stinking fume thereof, nearest resembling the horrible Stigian smoke of the pit that is bottomless.
Page 993 - Bacon; and some of them eat plentifully of it, the effect of which was a very pleasant comedy; for they turned natural fools upon it for several days: one would blow up a feather in the air; another would dart straws at it with much fury; and another stark naked was sitting up in a corner, like a monkey, grinning and making mows at them; a fourth would fondly kiss and paw his companions, and snear in their faces, with a countenance more antic than any in a Dutch droll.
Page 112 - ... perpendicular descent of many hundred feet, by ladders of bamboo and rattan, over a sea rolling violently against the rocks. When the mouth of the cavern is attained the perilous office of taking the nests must often be performed...
Page 624 - ... part of the berry is separated from the stone. This meal is then mixed with a little water, and formed into cakes, which, when dried in the sun, resemble in colour and flavour the sweetest gingerbread. The stones are afterwards put into a vessel of water, and shaken about so as to separate the meal which may still adhere to them.
Page 33 - in the plain near Hastings, where the Norman William, after his victory, found king Harold slain, he built Battle Abbey, which at last (as divers other monasteries) grew to a town enough populous. Thereabout is a place which, after rain, always looks red, which some have attributed to a very bloody sweat of the earth, as crying to heaven for revenge of so great a slaughter.

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