Martin Delany, Frederick Douglass, and the Politics of Representative Identity

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Univ of North Carolina Press, 1997 - History - 314 pages
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The differences between Frederick Douglass and Martin Delany have historically been reduced to a simple binary pronouncement: assimilationist versus separatist. Now Robert S. Levine restores the relationship of these two important nineteenth-century Afric
  

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Contents

Western Tour for the North Star DEbating Black Elevation
18
A Nation within a Nation Debating Uncle Toms Cabin and Black Emigration
58
Slaves of Appetite Temperate Revolutionism in Douglasss Mv Bondage and Mv Freedom
99
Heap of Witness The African American Presence in Stowes Dred
144
The Redemption of His Race Creating PanAfrican Community in Delanys Blake
177
True Patriotism True Stability
224
Notes
239
Index
305
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About the author (1997)

Robert S. Levine is associate professor of English at the University of Maryland. He is author of Conspiracy and Romance: Studies in Brockden Brown, Cooper, Hawthorne, and Melville and editor of a forthcoming collection of Martin Delany's writings.

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