Miscellaneous and Fugitive Pieces, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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T. Davies, 1774
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Page 123 - As to the return of his health and vigour, were you here, you might inquire of his haymakers ; but as to his temperance, I can answer that, for one whole day, we have had nothing for dinner but mutton-broth, beans and bacon, and a barn-door fowl.
Page 17 - The time is now come, in which every Englishman expects to be informed of the national affairs ; and in which he has a right to have that expectation gratified. For, whatever may be urged by ministers, or those whom vanity or interest make the followers of ministers, concerning the necessity of confidence in our...
Page 56 - WHEN we have before us such objects as excite love and complacency ; the body is affected, so far as I could observe, much in the following manner : the head reclines something on one side ; the eye-lids are more closed than usual, and the eyes roll gently with an inclination to the object ; the mouth is a little opened, and the breath drawn slowly, with now and then a low sigh ; the whole body is composed, and the hands fall idly to the sides. All this is accompanied with an inward sense of melting...
Page 49 - Looks through the horizontal mifty air Shorn of his beams, or from behind the moon In dim eclipfe difaftrous twilight fheds On half the nations, and with fear of change Perplexes monarchs. '.Darken'd fo, yet fhone Above them all th...
Page 52 - O'er the dark trees a yellower verdure shed, And tip with silver every mountain's head ; Then shine the vales, the rocks in prospect rise, A flood of glory bursts from all the skies : The conscious swains, rejoicing in the sight, Eye the blue vault, and bless the useful light.
Page 193 - Letcomb, where the Dean makes a great part of my imaginary entertainment, this being the cheapest way of treating me ; I hope he will not be displeased at this...
Page 210 - Burnet's letter to Mr Pope, Mr Pope's Temple of Fame, Mr Thomas Burnet's Grumbler on Mr Gay, and the Bishop of Ailsbury's Elegy, written either by Mr Gary or some other hand.
Page 102 - I had certain and repeated informations, from some who are in the secret of affairs, that a resolution was taken, by those who have power to execute it, to pursue me to the scaffold. My blood was to have been the cement of a new alliance, nor could my innocence be any security, after it had once been demanded from abroad, and resolved on at home, that it was necessary to cut me off.
Page 123 - I now hold the pen for my Lord Bolingbroke, who is reading your letter between two haycocks; but his attention is somewhat diverted, by casting his eyes on the clouds, not in admiration of what you say, but for fear of a shower.
Page 123 - He is pleased with your placing him in the triumvirate between yourself and me: though he says that he doubts he shall fare like Lepidus, while one of us runs away with all the power like Augustus, and another with all the pleasures like Anthony.

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