The Oriental, the Ancient and the Primitive: Systems of Marriage and the Family in the Pre-Industrial Societies of Eurasia

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Cambridge University Press, Feb 8, 1990 - Reference - 542 pages
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Continuing the comparative survey of pre-industrial family formation undertaken in The Development of Family and Marriage in Europe (1983), Professor Goody looks in depth at kinship practice in Asia. His findings cause him to question many traditional assumptions about the "primitive" East, and he suggests that, in contrast to pre-colonial Africa, kinship practice in Asia has much in common with that prevailing in parts of pre-industrial Europe. Goody examines the transmission of productive and other property in relation both to the prevailing political economy and to family and ideological structures, and explores the distribution of mechanisms and strategies of management across cultures. The book concludes that notions of western "uniqueness" are often misplaced, and that much previous work on Asian kinship has been unwittingly distorted by the application of concepts and approaches derived from other, inappropriate, social formations.
  

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Contents

The nature of the enterprise
1
Theorising
8
Transfers sale and incorporation
13
The plan
16
The incorporation of women marriage transactions and the continuity of the house
21
Diversity and unity
26
A Yangtze village
29
A Yunnan village
34
Siblings and property in Sri Lanka
240
The North and South
250
Differences in relationships
261
Group differences
271
Demographic variables
273
Female autonomy and female property
283
Kinship and modes of production
290
The abominations of the Egyptians
319

The continuity of the house
42
The lineage and the conjugal fund
52
The structure and organisation of lineages
60
The lineage and the domestic group
66
Lineages and corporations in comparative perspective
69
The conjugal fund and family fission
79
Partition the conjugal group and the lineage
86
Differentiation hierarchical and regional
93
Hierarchy and marriage
97
Regional differences
104
Changes over time
110
Local variation in Taiwan
113
Land polyandry and celibacy in Tibet
137
Polyandry and partition
139
Celibacy and illegitimacy
146
The nomads
149
Marriage and the family in Gujarat
160
Nandol
161
Marriage transactions
167
The high and the low
179
Divorce
184
Marriage transactions
185
Dowry and devolution in Hindu law
197
The celibacy of widows
201
Strategies of continuity
206
Age at marriage
207
Domestic groups
210
Hypergamy
214
Interpersonal relationships
219
The North and the South
229
Unity and diversity
230
Women and property
326
Wills
330
Explaining brothersister marriage
332
Love and marriage
339
Jacobs marriages
342
Endowment through bride service
347
Marriage and property in the Arab world
361
The heiress in ancient Greece
386
Monogamy property and control in Rome
397
forms of marriage
398
Law and change
409
Women and property under the Empire
415
The elementary family
420
Conjugal affection
423
Affection for children
424
Age at marriage
425
Hierarchical differences
426
Dowry continuity and change in the eastern Mediterranean
429
A hill settlement in Albania
430
The Sarakatsani shepherds
434
Farmers in southern Greece
439
The endowment of women in time and space
443
Asia and Europe
465
Women and property
468
Wider kin groups and the written law
478
Western and eastern families
482
Notes
488
References
508
Index
533
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How Societies Change
Daniel Chirot
No preview available - 1994
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About the author (1990)

Jack Goody is Emeritus Professor of Social Anthropology in the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of St John's College. Recently knighted by Her Majesty The Queen for services to anthropology, Professor Goody has researched and taught all over the world, is a Fellow of the British Academy and in 1980 was made a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2004 he was elected to the National Academy of Sciences and he was elected Commandeur des Arts et Lettres in 2006.

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