The Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology: An Introduction to Phenomenological Philosophy

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Northwestern University Press, 1970 - Philosophy - 405 pages
2 Reviews
The Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology, Husserl's last great work, is important both for its content and for the influence it has had on other philosophers. In this book, which remained unfinished at his death, Husserl attempts to forge a union between phenomenology and existentialism.

Husserl provides not only a history of philosophy but a philosophy of history. As he says in Part I, "The genuine spiritual struggles of European humanity as such take the form of struggles between the philosophies, that is, between the skeptical philosophies--or nonphilosophies, which retain the word but not the task--and the actual and still vital philosophies. But the vitality of the latter consists in the fact that they are struggling for their true and genuine meaning and thus for the meaning of a genuine humanity."
  

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Review: Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology

User Review  - Ben Kearvell - Goodreads

Husserl explores phenomenology via the context of history and the advent of objectivism--from the origins of geometry to Kant's epistemology. Fairly accessible as far as these things go, and easier on ... Read full review

Contents

THE CRISIS OF THE SCIENCES AS EXPRESSION
2
The failure of the new science after its initial success the
10
The project of the investigations of this work
16
Galileos mathematization of nature
23
The origin of dualism in the prevailing exemplary role
60
Descartes as the primal founder not only of the modern idea
73
Descartess obtrusive interest in objectivism as the reason
81
The genuine philosophical motif hidden in the absurdity
88
B The Way into Phenomenological Transcendental Phi
191
The fateful separation of transcendental philosophy and psy
198
Analysis of the reorientation from the psychological attitude
208
Preliminary discussion of the absurdity of giving equal status
215
Cartesian dualism as the reason for the parallelization Only
221
The dualism of the abstractions grounded in experience
230
The difficulties of psychological abstraction The paradox
241
The relation of transcendental psychology to transcendental
257

Preliminary discussion of the concept of the transcendental
97
the surrounding world
103
The lifeworld can be disclosed as a realm of subjective phe
111
The possibility of a hidden truth in Kants transcendental phi
118
f The problem of the lifeworld not as a partial problem
132
The peculiar character of the transcendental epochs as a total
148
Characterization of a new way to the reduction as contrasted
154
the basic sub
161
Preliminary concept of transcendental constitution as original
167
The task of an ontology of the lifeworld
173
A The Vienna Lecture
269
B Supplementary Texts
301
IE The Attitude of Natural Science and the Attitude of Human
315
Philosophy as Mankinds SelfReflection the SelfRealization
335
Objectivity and the World of Experience
343
The Origin of Geometry
353
The LifeWorld and the World of Science
379
Finks Appendix on the Problem of the Unconscious
385
Finks Outline for the Continuation of the Crisis
397
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About the author (1970)

Edmund Husserl, born in Moravia in 1859, was educated in Vienna and Berlin in mathematics and the physical sciences. Beginning in 1884, he decided to devote himself to philosophy. He later held professorships at the Universities of Halle, Göttingen, and Freiburg until his retirement in 1928. He died in 1938. Among his many published works is Experience and Judgment, also available from Northwestern University Press.

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