Twice-told Tales (Google eBook)

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Houghton, Mifflin, 1889 - 538 pages
22 Reviews
  

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His writing is so emotional. - Goodreads
... horribly dull pictures as well. - Goodreads
A real escape to the past in imagery and style. - Goodreads

Review: Twice-Told Tales

User Review  - Moira Halm - Goodreads

"Where all things fade, how miserable to be one that could not fade!" Before I started to type out this review: "Oh boy, I haven't managed to get around to this review yet. I hope I still remember ... Read full review

Review: Twice-Told Tales

User Review  - John HD Lucy - Goodreads

Hawthorne is a master of language. After reading all the stories and sketches in this massive collection, you should know that as a fact. If you get no other pleasure out of Hawthorne, then admiring ... Read full review

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Page 255 - Man must not disclaim his brotherhood, even with the guiltiest, since, though his hand be clean, his heart has surely been polluted by the flitting phantoms of iniquity.
Page 51 - Are you sure it is our parson?" inquired Goodman Gray of the sexton. "Of a certainty it is good Mr. Hooper," replied the sexton. "He was to have exchanged pulpits with Parson Shute, of Westbury; but Parson Shute sent to excuse himself yesterday, being to preach a funeral sermon." The cause of so much amazement may appear sufficiently slight. Mr. Hooper, a gentlemanly person, of about thirty, though still a bachelor, was dressed with due clerical neatness, as if a careful wife had starched his band,...
Page 164 - I am the chief person of the municipality, and exhibit, moreover, an admirable pattern to my brother officers, by the cool, steady, upright, downright, and impartial discharge of my business, and the constancy with which I stand to my post. Summer or winter, nobody seeks me in vain ; for, all day long, I am seen at the busiest corner, just above the market, stretching out my arms to rich and poor alike ; and at night I hold a lantern over my head, both to show where I am, and to keep people out of...
Page 170 - ... turbulence and manifold disquietudes of the world around me, to reach that deep, calm well of purity, which may be called my soul. And whenever I pour out that soul, it is to cool earth's fever, or cleanse its stains.
Page 364 - The old mountain has thrown a stone at us for fear we .should forget him," said the landlord, recovering himself. "He sometimes nods his head and threatens to come down, but we are old neighbors, and agree together pretty well upon the whole. Besides, we have a sure place of refuge hard by if he should be coming in good earnest." Let us now suppose the stranger to have finished his supper of bear's meat, and by his natural felicity of manner to have placed, himself on a footing of kindness with the...
Page 164 - Drink, and make room for that other fellow who seeks my aid to quench the fiery fever of last night's potations which he drained from no cup of mine.
Page 165 - Go draw the cork, tip the decanter; but, when your great toe shall set you a-roaring, it will be no affair of mine. If gentlemen love the pleasant titillation of the gout, it is all one to the Town Pump. This thirsty dog, with his red tongue lolling out, does not scorn my hospitality, but stands on his hind legs, and laps eagerly out of the trough. See how lightly he capers away again!
Page 64 - ... old clergyman. Natural connections he had none. But there was the decorously grave, though unmoved physician, seeking only to mitigate the last pangs of the patient whom he could not save. There were the deacons, and other eminently pious members of his church. There, also, was the Reverend Mr. Clark, of Westbury, a young and zealous divine, who had ridden in haste to pray by the bedside of the expiring minister.
Page 21 - There were the sober garb, the general severity of mien, the gloomy but undismayed expression, the scriptural forms of speech, and the confidence in Heaven's blessing on a righteous cause which would have marked a band of the original Puritans when threatened by some peril of the wilderness.
Page 26 - ... be raised to God in prayer, were irresistible. At the old man's word and outstretched arm, the roll of the drum was hushed at once, and the advancing line stood still. A tremulous enthusiasm seized upon the multitude. That stately form, combining the leader and the saint, so gray, so dimly seen, in such an ancient garb, could only belong to some old champion of the righteous cause, whom the oppressor's drum had summoned from his grave.