Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-glass: In One Volume

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Dell, 1992 - Juvenile Fiction - 416 pages
17 Reviews
'Begin at the beginning, and go on till you come to the end: then stop.'. So many readers were to take the advice of the King of Hearts that by the end of the nineteenth century the double Alice (1865 and 1872) had acquired a pre-eminent and unassailable position in children's literature. Lewis Carroll's use of logic, by which the ordinary is translated into the extraordinary in an entirely plausible way, is delightfully combined with an exceptional knowledge and understanding of the mind of the child. Satire, allusion, and symbolism weave deeper and mysterious meanings, lending a measure of immortality to Carroll's remarkable fantasy.

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Review: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland #1-2)

User Review  - Goodreads

I had an Alice In Wonderland birthday when I was 7. Consequently, I was fond of the character and books! Read full review

Review: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland #1-2)

User Review  - Huda Aweys - Goodreads

The story of a girl who fell into the rabbit hole to enter into this fantasy world for as long as filled my mind Now I think the bunny hole and that the fantasy world was our permanent getaway from reality .. It is .. when the escape from reality to fantasy come real ! Read full review

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Contents

CHIFTII PA01 I DOWN THE RABBITHOLE
1
TBS POOL OF TEAKS
15
ni A CAUCUSRACE AND A LONG TALE
29
Copyright

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About the author (1992)

"Lewis Carroll," creator of the brilliantly witty Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, was a pseudonym for Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, a shy Oxford don with a stammer.

He was born at Daresbury, Cheshire on January 27, 1832, son of a vicar. As the eldest boy among eleven children, he learned early to amuse his siblings by writing and editing family magazines. He was educated at Christ Church College, Oxford, where he lectured in mathematics from1855 to 1881. In 1861 he was ordained as a deacon.

Dodgson's entry into the world of fiction was accidental. It happened one "golden afternoon" as he escorted his colleague's three daughters on a trip up the river Isis. There he invented the story that might have been forgotten if not for the persistence of the youngest girl, Alice Liddell. Thanks to her, and to her encouraging friends, Alice was published in 1865, with drawings by the political cartoonist, John Tenniel. After Alice, Dodgson wrote Phantasmagoria and Other Poems (1869), Through the Looking-Glass (1871), The Hunting of Shark (1876, and Rhyme? and Reason? (1883).

As a mathematician Dodgson is best known for Euclid and His Modern Rivals (1879). He was also a superb children's photographer, who captured the delicate, sensuous beauty of such little girls as Alice Liddell and Ellen Terry, the future actress. W.H. Auden called him "one of the best portrait photographer of the century." Dodgson was also an inventor; his projects included a game of arithmetic croquet, a substitute for glue, and an apparatus for making notes in the dark. Though he sought publication for his light verse, he never dreamed his true gift-telling stories to children-merited publication or lasting fame, and he avoided publicity scrupulously Charles Dodgson died in 1898 of influenza.

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