Relation of the North to Slavery: A Discourse Preached in the Federal Street Meetinghouse, in Boston, on Sunday, June 11, 1854 (Google eBook)

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Crosby, Nichols & Company, 1854 - Slavery - 23 pages
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Page 26 - Constitution, or to embarrass the free exercise of the rights secured by the Constitution to the persons whose slaves escape from them? None at all; none at all.
Page 27 - South has been injured in this respect, and has a right to complain; and the North has been too careless of what I think the Constitution peremptorily and emphatically enjoins upon her as a duty.
Page 25 - ... beyond his reach, before a warrant could be procured from the judge to arrest him, even if the act of Congress authorized such a warrant. But it does not authorize the judge to issue a warrant to arrest the fugitive ; but evidently relied on the state authorities to protect the owner in making the seizure. And it is only when the fugitive is arrested and brought before the judge that he is directed to take the proof, and give the certificate of ownership. It is only necessary to state the provisions...
Page 27 - States, to do all that is necessary for the recapture of fugitive slaves, and for the restoration of them to those who claim them. Wherever I go, and whenever I speak on the subject— and when I speak here, I desire to speak to the whole North— I say that the South has been injured in this respect, and has a right to complain; and the North has been too careless of what I think the Constitution...
Page 27 - They probably, in the excitement of the times, have not stopped to consider of this. They have followed what seemed to be the current of thought and of motives, as the occasion arose, and they have neglected to investigate fully the real question, and to consider their Constitutional obligations; which, I am sure, if they did consider, they would fulfil with alacrity.
Page 25 - The state officers mentioned in the law are not bound to execute the duties imposed upon them by Congress, unless they choose to do so, or are required to do so by a law of the state ; and the State Legislature has the power, if it thinks proper, to prohibit them.
Page 27 - ... to their Constitutional obligations. I put it to all the sober and sound minds at the North as a question of morals and a question of conscience. What rig.ht have they, in their legislative capacity or any other capacity, to endeavor to get round this Constitution, or to embarrass the free exercise of the rights secured by the Constitution to the persons whose slaves escape from them?
Page 25 - Indeed, if the state authorities are absolved from all obligation to protect this right, and may stand by and see it violated without an effort to defend it, the act of congress of 1793 scarcely deserves the name of a remedy. The state officers mentioned in the law are not bound to execute the duties imposed upon them by congress, unless they choose to do so, or are required to do so by a law of the State ; and the state legislature has the power, if it thinks proper, to prohibit...
Page 27 - ... this Government to remove — which calls for the enactment of proper laws, authorizing the judicature of this Government, in the several States, to do all that is necessary for the recapture of fugitive slaves, and for the restoration of them to those who claim them. Wherever I go, and whenever I speak on the subject — and when I speak here, I desire to speak to the whole North...

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