Running after pills: politics, gender, and contraception in colonial Zimbabwe

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Heinemann, 2003 - History - 247 pages
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Kaler examines how modern contraceptive technologies, such as the pill and the Deop-Provera injection, were embroiled in gender and generation conflicts in Zimbabwe during the 1960s and 1970s.

Kaler examines how modern contraceptive technologies, such as the pill and the Deop-Provera injection, were embroiled in gender and generation conflicts, and in the national liberation struggle, in Zimbabwe during the 1960s and 1970s. Based on extensive oral and archival research, the book shows the ways in which fertility and control over reproduction within marriage and the family influenced the development of the imagined community of the nascent Zimbabwean nation.

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Contents

The Institutional History of Family Planning in Rhodesia
27
Local Knowledge of Physiology
81
Gender and Power in Marital
109
Copyright

3 other sections not shown

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About the author (2003)

AMY KALER is Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at University of Alberta.