Health by Exercise: What Exercises to Take and how to Take Them, to Remove Special Physical Weakness. Embracing an Account of the Swedish Methods, and a Summary of the Principles of Hygiene (Google eBook)

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American book exchange, 1880 - Exercise therapy - 408 pages
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Page 389 - ... beginning to see and understand that by this close union and co-operation of the material and immaterial natures, remedial agents may possibly find access to either or both through avenues that otherwise could have no existence. We have faith to believe that the time is near at hand when the mental aspects and relations of disease will receive an amount of attention equal to that which has always been given to the pulse and tongue, the temperature of the skin, and color and consistence of the...
Page 54 - Man has, in his own organs of movement, an efficient means for the preservation or restoration of health.' (c) Every valuable gymnastic movement has a well-defined physiological or psychical object and a definite beginning and end ; requires a certain degree of effort or exertion through will...
Page 388 - ... the headache, the nervousness, the heart disease, or the dyspeptic qualms which he is called upon to remedy, are only indications of some peculiar morbid state of the mind or of the emotional nature of the sufferer, which it becomes him to meet directly, rather than to torment his patient with an eternal round of palliatives.
Page 387 - ... every muscle of the body for their expression. Says a German writer,* "Who is unacquainted with the sparkling eye, the free respiration, the glowing color, and the serene brow of the joyous ? Who is not familiar with the trembling aspect, the hesitating utterance, the cold ruffled skin, the bristling hair, the palpitating heart, the impeded respiration, the paleness, the low pulse, and the thousand other signs of fear? The slow, oppressed breathing, interrupted by sobs, the cold, pallid, wrinkled...
Page 168 - ... placed so softly on the ground as not to jerk or shake the body in the slightest degree. As soon as the foot which has been placed on the ground becomes firm, the weight of the body is transported to the limb on that side, and the other foot, by a similar mechanism, is brought forward in its turn.
Page 29 - It points out the means of directing the corporeal energies into just those channels in which they are most needed, in order to perfect the balance of the physiological processes. It enables the system to develop and maintain its forces in greater amount, because it employs them naturally and without undue waste. And because it thus limits itself to a realm of facts concerning which there is no question, it has a right to expect the approval of physicians of all the different schools, even of those...
Page 292 - ... are of any value at the bedside, and while the enlightened practitioner is disposed to attach at least as much importance to a rational dietetic as to a specifically therapeutic mode of treatment, the value of investigations on normal respiration, in reference to the science of medicine, can never be overrated ; for when once the fact is universally admitted that the first...
Page 389 - We can not get rid of the sequences of the important fact, that in the human organism spirit governs matter, by brutishly ignoring it ; nor can we innocently treat it as an unimportant matter. Science, like true religion, is learning every day to live more by faith and less by sight. The jests that used to be hurled at the defenseless head of the practitioner who dared to suggest that the thoughts, and feelings and mental habits of the invalid might need rectifying as well as his bile and blood,...
Page 82 - Albinus1 took no superficial view of the organic activity in nature when he established the axiom that the essence of vital force consisted in motion. Even if this expression be far too general for organic action, it cannot be denied that we assume life to exist wherever we perceive a constant alternation of phenomena and incessant changes, induced by the constant motion of the molecules of the organized body, as well as of the organs themselves. Although Albinus overlooked the fact that, on the...
Page 292 - ... in many diseases is to furnish a copious supply of oxygen to the blood which has been loaded with imperfectly decomposed substances, and to remove as speedily as possible the carbonic acid which has accumulated in it, these observations will have afforded us true remedial agents, which exceed almost every other in the certainty of their action.

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