Our Iron-clad Ships: Their Qualities, Performances, and Cost. With Chapters on Turret Ships, Iron-clad Rams, &c (Google eBook)

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J. Murray, 1869 - Armored vessels - 332 pages
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Page 201 - In order to indicate clearly, but approximately only, the purpose in view, the author first considers the hypothetical cases of a long and a shorter ship, both of which are prismatic in a vertical sense. The length of the long ship is seven times its breadth, and its horizontal sections consist of two triangles set base to base. The length of the short ship is five times its breadth, the middle portion being parallel for two-fifths of the length, and the ends being wedge-shaped. It is assumed also,...
Page 244 - They are not sea-going or sea-keeping vessels. In even a slight sea the hatches must be battened down, and the effect upon the crew, if continued for a brief period in hot weather, would be most deleterious ; indeed, in such weather they are. not habitable ; but, in addition to this very serious objection, the speed of these vessels, owing to the foulness of their bottoms, is so low that they are not only unfit to chase, but in a gale of wind could not keep themselves from going ashore. Even in a...
Page 278 - Here en passant, let us for a moment consider the loss of this vessel in connection with the ram principle of attack. The Amazon, it is true, was a wooden ship, but she was fitted with a projecting prow, armed with a strong cleaver of cast-brass for the purpose of being used as a ram if occasion required. If she was, comparatively speaking, a small ship of war, the vessel she ran into was only a small coasting steamer of less than half her tonnage. Hence it is reasonable to conclude that the projecting...
Page 174 - ... only equal to that of its slowest ship, so the recent evolutions with ships of such different length and form have gone far to show that the rapid manoeuvring of a fleet must be regulated by its longest ships, for the diameter of the circles described by ' Black Prince' and ' Warrior' being, say 1,000 yards at moderate speed, a fleet of which they form part must move in circles with a radius of 500 yards in.stead of about 250, which could be done by vessels of the length of, and steering as readily...
Page 248 - ... to the sea, the water which comes on board is broken up in the same manner as when going head to it. In the trough of the sea her ports will be liable to be flooded, if required to use her guns to windward. This, therefore, would be the position selected by an antagonist who desired to fight a Monitor in a seaway.
Page 175 - ... not, however, lose sight of the fact that with all her good qualities the Achilles is, from her great length, most difficult to handle ; and this defect in action, more especially if engaged with a turret-ship, might be her ruin. " It is, perhaps, going beyond the bounds of what is probable, but I feel certain that this ship might, and probably would, have to go out of action to turn round, thus exposing herself in almost a defenceless position to the fire of more than one of the enemy's ships....
Page 188 - ... the very principles for which I laboured when in office. Long before I left office I wrote and published a paper, in which I said, as an epitome of my views, ' The merits of ironclad ships do not consist in carrying a large proportion of weights to engine-power, or having a high speed in proportion to that power ; but rather in possessing great powers of offence and defence, being comparatively short, cheap, and handy, and steaming at a high speed, not in the most economical way possible, but...
Page 174 - Channel should be completely armor-plated, forward and aft, except by a belt at the water-line. " "As the speed of a steam fleet is only equal to that of its slowest ship, so the recent evolutions with ships of such different length and form have gone far to show that the rapid manoeuvring of a fleet must be regulated by its longest ships, for the diameter of the circles described by Black Prince and Warrior...
Page 258 - ... even this would be of but poor account unless the other elements of efficiency mentioned above were duly secured. Among those elements is that of celerity in turning, and as it is a point to which sufficient attention has not been given hitherto, I wish to impress my convictions in regard to it. Every ironclad, as a matter of course, should be an unexceptionable ram. This, however, cannot be the case unless she can be directed with a great degree of promptness to any desired quarter, or turned...
Page 227 - Monarch, who, after the designs had been issued and the ship laid down, stated his conviction that "no satisfactorily designed turret-ship with rigging has yet been built or even laid down...

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