The Monthly Review (Google eBook)

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R. Griffiths., 1826
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Editors: May 1749-Sept. 1803, Ralph Griffiths; Oct. 1803-Apr. 1825, G. E. Griffiths.
  

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Page 199 - T do confess thou'rt smooth and fair, And I might have gone near to love thee. Had I not found the slightest prayer That lips could speak, had power to move thee; But I can let thee now alone, As worthy to be loved by none.
Page 300 - In such a cause, your success would be hazardous. America, if she fell, would fall like the strong man ; she would embrace the pillars of the state, and pull down the constitution along with her.
Page 425 - Though I should gaze for ever On that green light that lingers in the west: I may not hope from outward forms to win The passion and the life, whose fountains are within.
Page 230 - How, as in brazen pumps the pistons move, The membrane valve sustains the weight above; Stroke follows stroke, the gelid vapour falls, And misty dew-drops dim the crystal walls ; Rare and more rare expands the fluid thin, And silence dwells with vacancy within.
Page 71 - ... who, in noticing the power of the parent so to disinherit his children, thought it had not been amiss, if he had been bound to leave them at least a necessary subsistence...
Page 183 - ... enacted that, for the future, those who did not plead should be held guilty of the crimes laid to their charge. 5. The continent of Europe was the scene of an atrocious act of injustice committed by three crowned heads ; the first dismemberment of Poland was effected by an iniquitous confederacy between the emperor of Germany, the empress of Russia, and the king of Prussia ; they left the unfortunate monarch of the country little more than a nominal sovereignty, and even of this he was subsequently...
Page 235 - His views were most comprehensive, his arguments most acute; his diction was correct without stiffness, and his imagery splendid without glare. It was the vulgar notion of those who did not know Dr. Parr, that his information was confined to the structure of sentences, the etymology of words, the import of particles, and the quantity of syllables.
Page 118 - Place us on the banks of a river, or in an orchard, and we shall infallibly perish, either of thirst or hunger, if we do not, by an effort of industry, raise the water to our lips, or pluck the fruit from its parent tree.
Page 218 - The book he has now sent, shall be taken care of ; but of a former book mentioned in the note, Mr. Johnson has no remembrance, and can hardly think he ever received it, though bad health may possibly have made him negligent.''
Page 217 - Before dinner was finished, Mr. Garrick came in, full dressed, made many apologies for being so much later than he intended, but he had been unexpectedly detained at the House of Lords, and Lord Camden had absolutely insisted upon setting him down at the door of the hotel in his own carriage. Johnson said nothing, but he looked a volume. During the afternoon some literary dispute arose ; but Johnson sat silent, till the Dean of Derry very respectfully said, ' We all wish, Sir, for your opinion on...

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