My Mother, My Self: The Daughter's Search for Identity

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Delacorte Press, Jan 1, 1977 - Identification (Psychology) - 425 pages
25 Reviews

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Review: My Mother/My Self: The Daughter's Search for Identity

User Review  - L - Goodreads

It's a little old but some things are still relevant today. Intetesting read but wouldn't take it too literal since many stories/points don't pertain to everyone. Take what you can out of it & move on. Read full review

Review: My Mother/My Self: The Daughter's Search for Identity

User Review  - Reesha - Goodreads

I was able to better reflect on myself, my relationship with my mother, my childhood, and many of my anxieties while reading this book. Read with an open mind but do consider the different societal dynamics of the time; there are a number of outdated modes of thought expressed by the author. Read full review

Contents

Chapter
1
A TIME TO BE CLOSE
27
A TIME TO LET
62
Copyright

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About the author (1977)

Nancy Friday was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on August 27, 1937. She has made a career of writing about women's issues. Her first book, My Secret Garden, published in 1973, created a stir with its frank discussion of women's sexual fantasies. This theme was continued in Forbidden Flowers. In My Mother/My Self, Friday turns to another issue, the relationship between mothers and daughters. She returns to the subject of sexual fantasies in Men In Love, only this time approaching it from a male perspective. In The Power of Beauty, Friday explores how women's lives are affected by their appearance in a culture that values beauty. Friday is also the author of Jealousy, and Women On Top. Friday attended Wellesley College and has worked as a newspaper reporter, magazine editor, and freelance writer. Her articles have been published in magazines such as Cosmopolitan, Forum, and Playboy.

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